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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 302
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 302. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 302. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2510

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 302, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 302
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_321.jpg
Transcript 302 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Several remarkable facts deserve to be mentioned in connection with these singular peaks. In the first place, we are on historic ground. This is the scene of the greatest disaster that ever befell the army and the power of the Crusaders in the Holy Land. They had conquered it after many terrible battles, and held it for nearly a century; but on this occasion they had the brave Saladin, no ordinary general, to contend with, and their defeat was overwhelming and irreparable. This battle took place in July, 1187. There being no rain in Syria durino- the summer, streams and fountains dry up, cisterns get low, the ground is parched, and the air becomes insufferably hot; and what has been said in the histories of this event is no doubt true, that heat, thirst, and exhaustion helped to weaken the strength of the Christians, whose heroism and bravery on this occasion are worthy of the highest praise. It would seem that the Christians had at first the advantage of position, being encamped near the fountain of Sepphoris, where they had abundance of water. Saladin had taken Tiberias, and drawn up his army on the plateau to the west of the town. The Christian king, Guy of Lusignan, with less wisdom than daring, marched forward to meet the enemy. This was what Saladin desired, and he met them at the base of Hattin. The struggle was long and fierce, but the Christians were at last obliged to yield. A few brave knights cut their way through the Moslem ranks and fled to ' Akka; while others, including the king, with the Holy Cross, retreated to the summit of these hills, and, after they had repeatedly driven back the enemy with severe loss, were finally taken prisoners. Some of the knights were sold as slaves, some of the Templars and Hospitallers were executed ; and Raynold of Chatillon, who was Lord of Kerak, and who had been the immediate cause of the war, was slain by Saladin's own hand. If we are to credit tradition, these hills have been the scene of two other events immediately connected with the life of our Lord. This has been named the Mount of Beatitudes, because here, it is claimed, Christ delivered the Sermon on the Mount to the multitudes that stood below on the plain. The nature of the ground is such that the sermon might have been spoken here, and when reference was made to "a city that is set on a hill" (Matthew v. 14), the eyes of both the speaker and the multitude might have been lifted to Tabor in the south, or to Safed in the north, either of which places, with their imposing walls and towers, would form a striking illustration of the Master's words. Still further, it is claimed that on the side of these hills the five thousand were assembled whom Christ miraculously fed with five loaves and two fishes (Matthew xiv.), and even now there is pointed out to the traveller the " Stone of the Christian," which it is supposed served as a table on that memorable occasion. But as the Gospels do not mention or indicate any particular locality for the miracle, or any particular mount for the sermon, the scene of both, like that of the Transfiguration, must be left in doubt. Another fact, to which we would refer, is that these peaks and the region about them are of a basaltic formation. Some distance to the west, towards Sepphoris, one notices that the basalt is fading out, for it is mingled with limestone, while at Sepphoris limestone alone prevails. About Tell Hum, along the banks of the Upper Jordan, and at various points between the north end of the lake and the Horns of Hattin, the basalt appears. The dyke