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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 299
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 299. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 299. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2507

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 299, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 299
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_318.jpg
Transcript CANA. 299 About one mile south of the village of Kefr Kenna we pass a ruin called Jiftah, and near a hill, is the so-called tomb of Jonah. Jiftah has been regarded as a corruption of Gath H her with which it has been identified, and thus the birthplace of the prophet Jonah has b-en made known (2 Kings xiv.). It belonged to Zebulun, and Jerome states that it was two miles east of Sepphoris, on the way to Tiberias. In his day, also, even as it is in ours, was hown here the tomb of the oldest of the Hebrew prophets. If we have Biblical authority for the birthplace of Jonah, we have at least a venerable tradition for the place of his burial. It happens, however, that this is only one of the prophet's burial-places, which anomaly a native would have no difficulty in explaining by the rule that, if a man when living may have several houses, he may likewise when dead have several tombs. There can be no objection to honouring a great man by building for him a cenotaph, but, if several were built, it would inevitably become impossible after thirty centuries to tell in which of these he was buried. The little hill on which a few houses, including the tomb of Jonah, stand is called El Meshhad, and the Moslems of the region look upon the place with feelings of veneration (see page 294). The region is rocky but fertile, and clusters of fig and old olive trees are abundant. From this point the beautiful valley of Tur'an opens to the west and north-east, along the southern edo-e of which we pass, and reach in twenty minutes Kefr Kenna (see page 292). Only three or four minutes from the village is the well or fountain. As the village has no other well, the people in Christ's time drew water here, as do the people of to-day. The situation of Kefr Kenna, which has now but a few hundred inhabitants, is pleasant, and among its attractions are its gardens and its orchards of fruit-trees. Here the pomegranate will be specially noticed. It is extensively cultivated, and among the lovely things of this now desolate land, perhaps its gorgeous blossoms should be mentioned as one of the richest and most charming objects. There are found here many ancient ruins, most of which have been brought to light during the past few years, and the modern houses are less neglected than those of many other towns. At the well there is an ancient sarcophagus, used now as a watering-trough (see page 293). The time-worn rosettes and wreath upon it show with what care and skill it was made, and that it was designed to be an object of beauty as well as a resting-place for the dead. These sarcophagi, more frequently broken than whole, are found in great numbers throughout the country. About Sefuriyeh—Sepphoris—(see page 286), once the capital of Galilee, there are many; and at Gadara, east of the Jordan, they have been counted by hundreds. With their massive lids and rich ornamentation, they must have been very costly, and this fact may be taken as an incidental illustration of the wealth of the inhabitants in former times. In the morning, and again at night, groups of women and girls with their water-jars are gathered about this well, and shepherds also come with their flocks; and now and then a passing traveller may stop, to whom some friendly girl will offer a refreshing draught. If a person chooses he may still see in the Greek church one or more large earthen jars which are said to have been used at the time when the miracle was performed; but the water-pots mentioned by John were of stone.