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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 298
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 298. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 298. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2506

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 298, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 298
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_317.jpg
Transcript 298 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. defences, and placed there a strong garrison. Vespasian's general, Placidus, who was sent against the place, " found it impracticable to ascend the heights," and obtained possession of it only by stratagem. Its history during the long struggles between Crusaders and Moslems was a chequered one, and even in modern times this sacred mountain has become associated with one of the greatest conquerors of the world. The famous battle of Mount Tabor, which occurred April 16th, 1799, between the French and Turks, was fought near it by General Kleber under the eye of Napoleon himself. But far more inspiring than its historical associations is the magnificent view from its summit. Not only are beautiful fields in sight, but also many peaceful cities and villages, the silent mountains which were the pride of the Hebrews, and much of the country which was familiar to our Lord. In the north we see the Horns of Hattin (see page 296), Safed, and Hermon, the north end .of the Sea of Galilee (see page 297), and the great plateau of Bashan to the east; in the south-east, the hills of Gilead and the chasm-like depression of the Jordan Valley ; in the south, Gilboa (see page 269), and the hills of Samaria (see page 268); and in the west, Mount Carmel. Below us is the plain of Esdraelon, " one vast carpet thrown back to the hills of Samaria and the foot of Carmel," and north-west towards the Mediterranean. The landscape is exceedingly diversified, and the fertility of the soil of this province enabled it to be one of the most densely-populated regions on the globe. One fact connected with Mount Tabor is deserving of special notice, and that is, the clouds that gather about it during a large part of the summer (see page 287). In an almost cloudless land this gives special beauty to this isolated peak, which may have been one reason why the Hebrews gave special prominence to it when they declared, " as Tabor is among the mountains, and as Carmel by the sea" (Jeremiah xlvi. 18). The abundance of dew which falls there is also noticeable, and to this circumstance is to be attributed the freshness of vegetation on the slopes and about the foot of the mountain. In the fourth century, the period in which St. Jerome flourished, there was a tradition that Mount Tabor was the scene of the transfiguration of our Lord, and during the centuries since that time this opinion has been widely circulated ; but scholars are now quite unanimous in rejecting this view. It is almost certain that at this time Christ was farther north, and that this wonderful event took place elsewhere. From the summit of Tabor one sees, looking north towards Safed and the hills of Upper Galilee, a rolling country in which are situated Cana of Galilee (Kefr Kenna) and the Horns of Hattin; and beyond that is an extensive and fertile plain called El Biittauf (see page 292). In making our way north from the foot of Tabor we shall leave Nazareth on our left, and in two hours shall reach Kefr Kenna, where, according to ecclesiastical tradition, the first miracle of our Lord was performed. Before reaching El Meshhad we pass a spring and a small village on our left called Er Reineh. Near this point, on the 1st of May, 1187, the Franks won a victory over the Moslems, which, with nearly all else that they had gained in Palestine, was soon to be lost in the terrible slaughter at the Horns of Hattin.