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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 295
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 295. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 295. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2503

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 295, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 295
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_314.jpg
Transcript MOUNT HERMON. 295 h ve a right to say that natural objects furnished him with symbols and figures, it may be that Hermon, the Jordan, and the Sea of Galilee were in his mind when he spoke, in the Book of Revelation, of the " great white throne," proceeding from it " a river of the water of life," and "before it a sea of glass." No more appropriate language can be chosen with which to express the beauty and majesty of the scene witnessed from this ancient castle of Tiberias (see page 297)- From the top of Mount Hermon one can look down upon a large part of Palestine and Svria. To the east lies Damascus, one of the oldest cities in the world, a paradise in the midst of a desert. To the south-east the whole Bashan plain is visible, dotted everywhere with ruins. To the south the Jordan Valley can be seen throughout its entire length. It is a vast chasm, from six to twelve miles wide, sunk between two walls of mountains which rise on either side from two to five thousand feet. Almost at the foot of Hermon is Lake Huleh, the Merom of the Bible. Farther south is the Lake of Tiberias, while seventy miles below that one beholds the Dead Sea. To the west of the Jordan rise, peak after peak, many of the sacred hills of western Palestine, such as Tabor, the hill at Nazareth, Olivet, Carmel, and others; while the expanse of the Mediterranean, which stretches away to the sky, seems almost boundless. But, if the view from Hermon is one of the finest in the world, there are among the mountains of Galilee a few summits which are not difficult of access, and which command a wide and beautiful prospect. First among these should be mentioned the hill at Nazareth and Mount Tabor (see page 287). To reach the latter from Tiberias, we ascend from the lake a thousand feet, and reach the edge of an uneven table-land, which stretches to the south almost to the very foot of the mountain. This is a region of great fertility, and, towards the western part, is dotted with oak-groves, which adorn the valleys and gentle slopes, and furnish delightful shade. Its broad fields are finely cultivated, and rich harvests reward the husbandmen. It has a few small villages, but the most interesting point is the great khan of merchants, Khan et Tujjar, called thus from the fact that fairs or markets are held there every Monday. The buildings are not kept in repair, nor is the place inhabited, but on market-days the whole region is alive with tents and camels, horses, donkeys, sheep, goats, and cattle, men, women, and children, peasants, Arabs, and Jews. There is a good deal of noise and loud talking; the barking of numerous dogs adds to the general confusion; buying, selling, and exchange go on until the day is ended, and the following morning discloses the fact that the busy crowd has dispersed. Much of the trade is what we call " barter," but Arabs from a distance, and peasants and village-people, are able in this way to supply themselves with what they need for their tents and houses, or for their work in the fields. Tabor, no doubt, appears most imposing when approached from the Esdraelon plain on the south (see page 261). It rises, however, so abruptly and to such a height above the surrounding country that, when approached from any point, its graceful form and rounded summit not only attract the eye of the beholder, but convince him that Tabor deserves to