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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 291
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 291. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2499.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 291. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2499

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 291, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2499.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 291
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_310.jpg
Transcript TIBERIAS. 291 aj 0f the angles; while the castle on the summit must, like Safed, Tabor, and Gamala, have formed one of the strongholds of the country. On the brow of the hill, a little to the -est of this castle, we ourselves discovered a hot-air cave, which we made more than one ttempt to explore. Its distance from the hot springs would be nearly a mile, to say nothing of its height above them ; but the current of hot vapour had made it impossible to take any lights with us, and in the interior the walls and rocks were so slippery that it was unsafe to cr0 far, although we had a rope lashed round us, and strong men outside the cave to hold it who might thus recover us in case of any accident. This cave is a natural and perfect steam-bath. The Jews in Tiberias appear to be very numerous, yet they number probably less than one thousand souls. Not far from the shore, and north of the Jews' quarter, is the Latin convent, said to have been built on the site of the miraculous draught of fishes (John xxi.), where small and poor accommodations can be obtained by the traveller. There is also a buildino- which answers to a locanda, or hotel, and a Jew of the better class also entertains travellers in his own house ; but one must not expect much luxury or comfort in Tiberias, and a tent on the hillside or the shore of the lake is by far the cleanest and the most desirable mode of sojourn in this " holy city." The hot baths are frequented by Arabs, Syrians, and foreigners ; and sometimes the crowds about them, and along the shore toward the city, present not only a lively, but, on account of the strange costumes of the people, a variegated scene. An old man named Haj Ali, whom we employed once as a hunter, an Algerine by birth, who had visited Mecca—a quiet, reserved, and dignified person—was the keeper of the bath, and from him we had " the freedom of the place." A serious drawback to comfort, however, was the fact that visitors bathe in the common basin, and the water is changed none too often. Some complaints are no doubt benefited by bathing here, and, with proper care, the springs might be made not only a comfort or a luxury, but a real blessing to the people of the land. The baths themselves, and all the buildings about them, were thoroughly repaired by Ibrahim Pasha in 1832—40; but to-day, although still in use, they are practically in ruins, " a fine example of the wise Turkish administration." It was about the middle of the last century that the present walls of Tiberias were built and the castle repaired, which, had it not been for the terrible earthquake in 1837, might even now be in tolerable condition. As it is, the walls are dilapidated and the spacious castle is deserted, or occupied only by a handful of soldiers—a sort of police force, whose pay is very small and whose living is precarious. Near the modern castle is an old mosque that has shared in the general neglect and decay, and the few stunted palms about it hardly remind one of the gardens, and groves, and natural beauty of the royal city of Antipas (see pages 300 and 301). But if the castle is in ruins, the view from it to the east and north, over the Sea of Galilee, is inspiring (see page 297). On the east side of the lake there is a wall of hills which are really the western bank of the great table-land of Gaulanitis (see page 300). On