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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 290
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 290. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2498.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 290. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2498

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 290, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2498.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 290
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_309.jpg
Transcript 2gQ PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. cemetery, and was consequently unclean. The thought of residing there was repulsive to the Jews, and Herod had to resort to various expedients to induce people to live in his new town. Josephus states that " many were necessitated by Herod to come thither out of the country belonging to him, and were by force compelled to be its inhabitants. Some of them were persons of condition He also admitted poor people, such as those that were collected from all parts, to dwell in it. Nay, some of them were not quite freemen, and these he was a benefactor to, and made them free in great numbers, but obliged them not to forsake the city, by building them very good houses at his own expense, and by giving them land also; for he was sensible that to make this place a habitation was to transgress the ancient Jewish laws, because many sepulchres had to be taken away in order to make room for the city " (" Antiquities," xviii. 2, 3). This offence passed away with time, for a generation later Tiberias and Sepphoris (see page 286) were the most important cities of Galilee, and still later Tiberias became the seat of the Sanhedrim, and the residence of many learned and eminent rabbis. Further, it had at one time as many as thirteen synagogues. The Mishna was completed here by Rabbi Judah, called "the Holy," a.d. 220. The Jerusalem Talmud was also written here, about a century later, and the ancient Jewish writers themselves are authority for the statement that " the university of Tiberias was greater than that of Zippor or Sepphoris." The graves of Rabbis Ami, Ashe, and Akiba, and of the famous scholar Maimonides, are pointed out in the Jewish burial-ground to the west of the present city. St. Jerome also considered himself fortunate in having had for his teacher in Hebrew a learned Jew from this famous city. It is not known that Christ ever visited Tiberias, and some writers would account for the supposed fact by a reference to the ceremonial uncleanness of the place, while others think he did not wish to put himself unnecessarily into the power of Antipas. The rebuilding of Tiberias cannot have taken place before a.d. 20, or later than a.d, 27; hence we know nearly at what period of Christ's life this work went on. With the princely means of Antipas lavished upon it to make it a perfect city, its growth was rapid and its period of prosperity was permanent and long-continued. Here rose, as if by magic, fine Grecian colonnades, Roman gates, and costly public edifices, including the palace of Herod, while the streets and squares of the city were adorned with marble statues, and its synagogue was one of the finest in the province of Galilee. Here the council of the nobles of Tiberias, consisting of six hundred members, held its sessions during the Jewish War. The strengt of the place at that time is indicated by the fact that Vespasian did not dare to approach the city with less than three legions of his best troops. The steep hill already referred to, which overlooked the old city, rises to a perpendicu ar height of one thousand feet. It is full of ancient caves, some of which are over one hundre feet in length, with cemented walls and abundant evidences of their having been occupie as dwellings. They are now principally the abode of hyenas, foxes, and jackals. The 0 wall of the town led up on the south side of this hill in a zigzag line, and cisterns exist <