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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 288
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 288. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 288. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2496

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 288, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 288
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_307.jpg
Transcript 288 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the plain of Gennesaret (see page 308), and of the quiet lake upon which the Master sailed, and by which he taught, and " did many mighty works" (see page 309). A more charming and picturesque region could not be found in the East than Galilee, the northern province of the Holy Land. Mountains, valleys, plains, rivers, springs, and lakes combine to make the natural scenery remarkable, even when compared with those portions of the world which are much better known and far more widely praised. With regard to particular localities in Palestine, it is a great satisfaction to know that about some of the most interesting places there can be no doubt. Hermon, Tabor, Carmel, Jerusalem, the Jordan, the Sea of Galilee, and even humble Nazareth, occupy the same points that they did when looked upon or visited by Christ. This certainty adds much to the value of all historical allusions to any given place, and greatly enhances the pleasure of those who love to study the past on the very ground where its great events were enacted. Tiberias was one of the most important towns of Galilee. It was once an attractive and beautiful city, but to-day it is in ruins, like almost everything else in the country upon which the eye may rest. Even the very soil of Palestine has degenerated with the decay of former enterprise and prosperity. He who visits Tiberias now will find the shore lined with ruins of what were once stately structures, filth and wretchedness among its degraded inhabitants; and his view of the lake and its surrounding hills must be obtained, not from the roof of some splendid palace, but from the broken city walls and the crumbling castle (see pages 297 and 301). The present town (see page 300) which travellers visit is comparatively modern, while the ancient city of Herod Antipas stretched to the south of it along the shore for more than a mile. The space between the water's edge and the steep hill to the west is completely covered with ruins, and among these are to be found whatever remains still exist of the times of Christ. The hot springs (see page 303), the tombs, the fine columns and ornamental work, the theatre, and the wall which runs up to the summit of the hill just referred to, where stood the ancient castle, date no doubt from the first century, if not from the days of Antipas himself. The family of Herods were famous builders, and it is to a son of Herod the Great that Tiberias owes, if not its origin, at least its rank among the cities of Galilee. Such attractions for health and pleasure as were afforded by these hot springs would have made this place widely known, and one of great resort from the earliest occupation of the country; and in the list of the fortified cities of Naphtali (Joshua xix. 35—38) these springs are doubtless referred to under the name Hammath. The order 0 names in this passage is Hammath, Rakkath, and Chinnereth ; and some scholars have supposed that Rakkath is identical with Tiberias. If this cannot be proved, there is evidence that immediately north of the hot springs there was an ancient town, which was so thoroug > remodelled and rebuilt by Herod Antipas as to justify the general impression that Tiberias was founded by him. Even after the city was built it remained in some respects distinc from that at the springs, and in other respects it was regarded as identical with it. This will be sufficiently illustrated by the following statement from the Jerusalem Talmud, w e