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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 285
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 285. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2493.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 285. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2493

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 285, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2493.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 285
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_304.jpg
Transcript NAZARETH. 285 . t tjiejr heels. The open space is the rendezvous of the town, for there is no "gate of •r " where there is no wall. Hither we may be quite sure the Virgin-mother daily came tnc y^i-^j f 11 -ed bv her Divine Son, and often He, too, as He grew up, would carry his pitcher with 1 ' other as we may see the boys of Nazareth to-day. Here, says the tradition, the angel C 1 riel appeared to Mary, and hence the Great Church of the Greeks just above is A dicated to Gabriel. The present church is a modern structure, but occupies the site of one hich existed in the time of Arculph, a.d. 700. The spring is under the church, a portion of diich is actually cut out of the rock. There is a well let down in the pavement, by which water is raised for the use of pilgrims, and a channel of masonry at a considerable depth conveys the stream to the public fountain. The Latin holy place is the Franciscan convent, where many an Englishman has been hospitably and kindly entertained, and which, it is pretended, occupies, or rather contains, the site of the house of Joseph and Mary before it took its aerial voyage to Loretto. This site, too, is as old as the time of Arculph, and a succession of churches has occupied the ground. At first we only know of a rock-cut grotto, said to be the Virgin's house. Then succeeded a Greek church. The Crusaders erected a oreat church on the same site, of which portions existed when Maundrell visited Nazareth two hundred and fifty years ago. The modern church and monastery is only about one hundred and eighty years old, but undoubtedly cover the traditional grotto, which is still shown. The other so-called holy places, such as Joseph's workshop, are of comparatively recent origin, and have little to interest, nor have they any pretensions to architectural beauty. No less than six Christian churches and sects are represented in Nazareth, and for once the English Church asserts her rightful position as the representative of the Reformation in the East. Three of the most conspicuous buildings in Nazareth are the English Church, the Protestant Hospital connected with it, open to all, and the Orphanage for Girls, recently built by the English Female Education Society for the East. They all stand high, and the orphanage overlooks the whole place, perched just beneath the summit of Neby Sa'in. The English church was raised by the gifts of English visitors, but its Gothic tower was the gift of the Grand Duke of Mecklenburg, as a memorial of his visit to the Holy Land. The schools, both of the Church Missionary Society, in the centre of the town, and of the Female Education Society, will repay a visit, and have stimulated largely educational effort on the part of the native churches. There is a considerable Protestant population in Nazareth, which owes much to the persevering labours for many years of the Rev. J. Zeller, now of Jerusalem. We cannot fail to notice both the bright costumes and the healthy, intelligent, and often beautiful faces and figures of the women of Nazareth, owing, doubtless, in some degree, as in the case of their Bethlehemite sisters, to the admixture of Crusading blood in their veins. But this cannot be the sole cause, as in the sixth century they are spoken of as noted for their beauty, which was attributed to the blessing of the Virgin. Being chiefly Christians they are unveiled, and in some respects dress like the women of Bethlehem. They differ, however, in tneir head-dress, carrying on each side of the face a rouleau of silver coins fastened to a sort