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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 283
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 283. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2491.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 283. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2491

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 283, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2491.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 283
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_302.jpg
Transcript NAZARETH. 283 gu O which render Nazareth the least desolate and forsaken of all the towns of Palestine. Itself restino- on a very steep slope, it is encircled by hills on all sides, leaving an undulating saucer-shaped basin, with many little valleys running into it on both sides and in front of the town. Dean Stanley remarks that fifteen green hills rise round it like the edge of a shell to ard it from intrusion, "enclosed by mountains as a flower is by leaves." Unlike Bethlehem nd the cities of Judah and Benjamin perched on the hilltops, unlike Shechem, where gushing fountains and perennial streams have invited the earliest settlements of men, the site of Nazareth offers none of the advantages which have usually determined the position of Eastern cities. It seems to court obscurity and seclusion. The encircling cluster of hills is in fact the melting away of the hills of Galilee as they are lost in, the Plain of Esdraelon. Nazareth clings to the steep slope of the last of these which deserves the name of hill, while the amphitheatre in front is formed by the smaller ridges, mere gentle swellings enclosing the shallow basin, which forms the foreground in their sweep. The enclosing sides are towards the south and east well cultivated, corn-fields mingle with vineyards and fig-trees, and the occasional date palms, which here reach their northern limit, are marked features in the home landscape (see page 284). But the encircling rim is bare, rocky, and in winter white and naked, a soft chalky limestone. However refreshing, the scenery about Nazareth is the reverse of grand. There are no sublime heights, no deep ravines, no forest solitudes, as a French writer has suggested, to fill a boyish mind with wild dreams or enthusiastic visions, nothing here to suggest dreams of heroism or to feed the reveries of romance—an ordinary busy place, it was the natural nursery of one whose mission it was to meet man and man's deepest needs on the platform of commonplace daily life. Unknown and unnamed in Old Testament history, itself the theatre of no one event in the nation's life, though almost within sight of its most stirring scenes, it never reached the dignity of a walled town or city; till within the last few years it was but a village, owing its celebrity only to that event which has entwined its memories with our holiest thoughts. It has but one fountain, and very few remains of antiquity, consisting only of the traces of buildings and foundations a little above the present town, which seems to have slid down the hill a little from the ancient village. The erections of Nazareth are for the most part very modern. It is the one place in Palestine which has thriven and grown in the last few years, and out of a population of six thousand counts about four thousand Christians. The Jews are very few, and have only been drawn by the allurements of trade, for the associations of Nazareth are naturally repellent to them, and they have their own holy cities of Safed and Tiberias within easy distance. But though the buildings are modern, the streets are truly Oriental in their lack of arrangement. The sides of the hill are so steep, that frequently while there are houses on one side, the other side of the street is simply a wall of rock, where the stones have been hewn for the houses opposite. Heaps of rubbish intervene in most inopportune spots, and the writer well remei*bers, on his first entrance into Nazareth by night, finding himself and his horse perched on the roof of a house, to which he had ridden from a mound of masons' refuse.