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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 282
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 282. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 282. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2490

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 282, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 282
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_301.jpg
Transcript 2S2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. was appalled at her own success when the prophet's figure arose from the earth. In many hillside villages to the present day a portion of the dwelling is excavated, and forms the inner chamber of the family. They are true cave-dwellings, such as the Amalekites, and before them the Horites, used—the earliest settled homes of man when he left the nomad life, and in parts of Southern Judaea seem to have been the only kind of dwelling used down- to the devastation of the country by the Saracens. In fact, they are merely on a small and humble scale the counterparts of the sumptuous and imposing palaces of Petra, where art and civilisation adorned, but never changed, the pristine domestic architecture of the nation. Two paths will lead us from Endor across the plain to that centre of Christian interest, Nazareth ; one, the more direct, to the westward, enters the hilly country by Yafa, two miles south of Nazareth, the ancient Japhia, noted for a fearful slaughter of the Jews by the Romans, against whom it had been held by Josephus. The palm-trees which surround it give it a cheerful air to which Shunem, Nain, and Endor are strangers. But the best road lies to the north of this, taking the village of Iksal and Deburieh on the way, which will repay us for the slight detour. But the panorama near the foot of Tabor illustrates from a new standpoint the strategy of the various battles on this blood-stained plain. We are on the dividing of the watersheds of the Mediterranean and the Jordan. On our left a little stream trickles towards the Kishon. A few feet to the west a rill from the marsh helps to feed the Wady Bireh, and finds its way to the Dead Sea. The Jordan Valley is not revealed; but the long and even range of the Hauran, furrowed and ridged with a faint capping of cloud, bounds the eastern horizon, and southwards the taller crest of Ajlun ; on the west the dark hump of Carmel runs into the hills of Samaria, and the corner of Gilboa projects on the south beyond Jebel Duhy. The view of Tabor from this road is effective, and gives the impression of greater height than it really possesses, for it is only fourteen hundred feet above the plain, not very much higher than the bluffs behind Nazareth ; but its perfect symmetry of form, its isolated position standing out into the plain completely severed from the Galilean hills behind it, its wooded slopes, and especially from this point of view the magnificent setting of snowy Hermon for its background, make it one of the most striking features of Palestine. But we leave its ascent for another chapter ; and after a glance at the cheerful, thriving village of Deburieh, where there is a little Protestant congregation under the auspices of the Church Missionary Society, we turn down on Iksal, the ancient Chesulloth. The place is worth a visit if only for the strong mediaeval fortress which still remains, with two fine vaulted halls, built probably by the Crusaders, judging from its architecture and the fact that sculptured sarcophagi and altars are built into the walls, and there are remains of towers at each corner of the square fort. A bold ridge separates Iksal from Nazareth, known as the Mount of Precipitation, from the tradition that it was to the edge of this cliff that His infuriated townsmen brought our Lord to cast Him down (see page 278). The topography confutes the legend : Nazareth itself, as we shall see, lying on the side of a hill with many a steep cliff above it. Descending this steep ridge, we find ourselves at once in one of the pleasant valleys, planted and cultivated, . I