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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 280
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 280. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2488.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 280. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2488

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 280, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2488.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 280
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_299.jpg
Transcript 280 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE unerring mark of the perennial fountain. It bears no trace of having ever been a walled city but it is hardly probable that so large an enceinte as the foundations reveal should have be anciently unprotected. " The gate of the city" would probably be on the side facing west- and though there are rock-hewn tombs both east and west of the place, it would naturally b on this side, a three hours' walk from Nazareth, that our Lord met the funeral procession of the widowed mother's only son, and by His act of divine power and love has immortalised that obscure village for all time. On the west side also, near the place of tombs, is a little Mohammedan wely or mosque, poor and insignificant, but by its name, the " Place of our Lord Jesus," recalling the incident, and probably built on the site of some chapel consecrated to the memory of the miracle in Christian times. The widow's house, a mere heap of stones is still pointed out by the inhabitants, who here as elsewhere reverence any tradition connected with the life of our Lord, though they generally have them in strangely distorted forms. Though the graveyard of Nain lies unfenced, marked only by the little stone mound and whitened plastered tombs that serve for headstones, though the buildings, gardens, and trees have all gone, and leave a sense of desolation behind, still the paths and the features of the landscape remain, and are all we want. The story of the past rises up more vividly in a dreary lonely spot like this, than among the chapels and shrines that disfigure and encumber many a so-called " holy place." The old rock-hewn tombs are just behind the modern cemetery, probably used also by the poorer inhabitants in our Lord's time; and very near is the ancient fountain, a square cistern with the water conducted to it from the hills by a small square-built subterranean aqueduct. The fountain is evidently of ancient masonry. (See page 271). A walk of little more than two miles east brings us to another village, in many of its features a repetition of Nain, a collection of mud huts, pitched almost on the side of the hill after the fashion of swallows' nests, while the rocks behind them are perforated with small caves in all directions (see page 273). Not a tree or shrub relieves the monotony of the scene, only a few untidy straggling hedges of prickly pear by their ungainly shape add to the impression of squalor. It may be fancy from historic association, but certainly the place has a strange weird-like aspect, well suited for the home of the necromancer, and its inhabitants to-day are among the most ragged and squalid of even this poverty-stricken land. As t Nain, so to Endor, nature has enticed inhabitants of some kind, for there is an unfaihr spring, from which it takes its name, En-dor, the " Fountain of Dor;" and past this place the Midianites fled before Gideon—many fell, perhaps, as they endeavoured to quench their thir at the spring, in their headlong rush towards the Jordan. But it is the history of Saul WW has given the little village its fame. Here we can trace the midnight walk of the king roun the shoulder of Jebel Duhy, where the undulating ground would effectually conceal him fro the enemy's outposts as he came, forsaken by his God, to consult the witch. The Scnpti nowhere states that this dealer with the Evil One dwelt in a cave; but when we look at the grimy caves, each with the remains of buildings in front of it, we may well picture one them as the cavernous abode, the inner chamber in which she performed her magic rites