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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 277
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 277. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2486.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 277. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2486

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 277, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2486.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 277
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_297.jpg
Transcript ^M BATTLE-FIELDS. 277 remained in Canaanite hands, and hither to their friends and kinsfolk the Philistines carried their trophies, and mutilated and exposed the royal corpses. From Ras Seiban a fine panorama is stretched, in which the widespread ruins and arches of Beisan (Bethshean) are conspicuous. This hill seems still to be a stronghold of the aboriginal races. The fellahin of Mezar and Jelbon are very dark and square-built, and recall our ideal of the old Canaanites. Mohammedan in name and fanaticism, though very ignorant of the tenets of the Prophet, they attach far greater importance to the worship of the new moon on the high places of this ridge, like Ras Seiban, than to the ceremonial of the mosque. They seem, in fact, to be an isolated survival left overlooked by successive waves of conquerors on these barren, uninviting heights. We have not yet completed the circuit of battle-fields which fringe uninterruptedly this historic plain. Let us look westward, where the nullahs of Taanach, Rimmon, and Megiddo, and others beyond in rapid succession, push into the plain. Here was fought the battle of Meo-iddo, when the last of the great Kings of Judah, Josiah, fell, and the kingdom received a blow from which it never rallied. The Egyptian King, Pharaoh Necho, in his march against Assyria, had rounded the promontory of Carmel, coming up by the Plain of Sharon, and thus following up the course of the Kishon, encountered the army of Judah at Megiddo. We can see the four "tells," or heaps, of Lejjun, Ta'anuk, Rummaneh, and Mutesellim, which seem to have been the " Quadrilateral " on which the king relied, and where he elected to resist the invader. We know no further details of the battle than the death of Josiah, annually bewailed with the weeping of Hadad-rimmon. It has been suggested that most probably it was on the very same field that the kingdom of Israel had already received its death-blow, and that here Shalmaneser defeated Hosea, its last monarch. The event is referred to by Hosea the prophet, who speaks prophetically of the bow of Israel as broken in the Valley of Jezreel, and again historically of Shalmaneser's butchery at Beth Arbel. We cannot however, identify Beth Arbel with any spot in this neighbourhood; and as there is an almost unquestioned identification of one Beth Arbel with Irbid, close to Hattin, by the Lake of Gennesaret, we should rather place the overthrow of the northern kingdom on the upland plain of Hattin, where the last army of the Crusaders was annihilated. We have lingered long on the sides of Mount Gilboa, for the view from Jezreel has suggested a reminiscence of every battle which has rendered this plain famous. Let us now cross the southern branch of the eastern plain, and we shall find ourselves among scenes which arouse less martial but more hallowed memories than these, which have been called the most secular of sacred history. It is but a short walk across the head of the plain from 'Ain Jalud to Shunem (Sulem), near the base of the opposite hill; in fact it rests upon its foot. The village is one of the least attractive and most squalid in the country, surrounded by mean enclosures and ungainly hedges of prickly pear, with crooked lanes always ankle-deep either in sand or mud, according to the weather. All the houses but one are of mud, and there is nothing to lead us to picture it as the home either of a fair Shunammite or of a great lady (see page 269).