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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 276
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 276. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 276. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 276, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 276
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_296.jpg
Transcript 276 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Gideon did not hesitate to push his successes far beyond merely driving back the invading hordes. He pushed across Jordan into the wilds of Eastern Manasseh, retraced the path by which Jacob had led his family to the Land of Promise, and long after the remnant of the invaders had dreamt themselves safe in their own Eastern plains, he burst upon them at Jogbehah (Jubehat), and utterly routed them, and captured their chiefs, Zebah and Zulmunna. The name of Gilboa evokes, however, not only glorious but also humiliating memories for the annalist of Israel, "for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though "he had not been anointed with oil." Just two hundred years after the great battle of Gideon, hostile hosts were again mustered on the same plain, almost on the same spot. The Philistines, reversing the march of the Midianites, had come up from the coast, and pitched in Shunem, the modern Sulem (see page 269), very near the camping ground of the Midianites, but leaning rather more on the hill for security, while Saul gathered the men of Israel at the base of Gilboa, at the fountain of Harod ('Ain Jalud), the trysting spot of Gideon's heroes, and perhaps in memory of their victory (1 Sam. xxviii. 4). Very different was the result. Unlike the midnight dash of those men of Manasseh was the timid, hesitating conduct of the army of Israel. With the steep, rugged cliffs behind them, they waited the Philistines' assault, on ground where retreat was impossible, where there was no space to rally or reform a shaken line, and where, therefore, defeat or even failure meant utter rout and destruction. Standing over the bluff over Gideon's Pool, we can vividly picture the whole scene. The irregular hedges of prickly pear mark the village of Shunem, where lay the Philistine army. The conscience-stricken king, with dark forebodings weighing down his spirits, longs to take counsel with the witch of Endor, since the Lord will give him no guidance or comfort. To do this he must cross the plain where the Philistines are encamped, and then surmount the ridge of Jebel Duhy, on the other side of which, facing Tabor, are the huts and caves of Endor. The midnight visit must have been made round the eastern shoulder of the hill, by a tract which we can trace across the plain, and then a detour would bring him down on Endor. Heavy in heart and weary in body, appalled by the invited though unwelcome apparition of Samuel, the king returns before daybreak, but only just before, and in ill plight for a chivalrous onslaught. The Philistines ere sunrise had deployed across the plain past Jezreel to Aphek (probably Fuku'a), thus turning the positioi of Saul, and hemming him in between the precipices and the enemy on either side. Thus was on the bare hill itself that the slaughter chiefly took place, and on the heights that Saul and Jonathan were slain. When we look on the rugged ridges of Gilboa, it requires no stretch of imagination to feel that the malediction has been fulfilled : " Ye mountains o Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain, upon you, nor fields of offerings: there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away " (2 Sam. i. 21). If we ascend to the crest of the ridge two or three miles to the east, to El Ma little Moslem village of great reputed sanctity, we may trace the whole course of the of Saul's army, fleeing towards the Jordan valley. Bethshean, the key of the valley, si