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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 272
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 272. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2481.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 272. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2481

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 272, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2481.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 272
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_292.jpg
Transcript 2?2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the settlement of Israel that we read of an invasion from the east or desert side. Th hordes of nomads, with their camels and dromedaries, came up countless as the sand b • the seashore, and spread from the east end of the Plain of Jezreel, where they had crossed the Jordan, as far as the Bay of Acre. Thence, keeping always in the low ground, and reversing the course of the modern French invaders, they doubled the promontory ,,f Carmel, overran the rich expanse of Sharon and the Plain of Philistia, till they came unto Gaza, to the very confines of the southern desert, sweeping off the herds of cattle and destroying the increase of the earth, hastily cutting off the ears of corn with their scimitars and loading therewith their capacious camel-sacks, and meanwhile wasting and trampling down more than they carried off; for they had of course selected the harvest-time for their inroad. It was evidently a well-organized invasion, on a greater scale than any that have followed it from that side, excepting only the Saracenic conquest under Omar. \ | only the Midianites who roamed over the regions of the modern 'Anizeh and Beni Sakkr, but the Amalekites from the south, and " the children of the East," the hordes of the Syrian desert as far as the Euphrates, had combined for the foray. But though their foraging parties went as far as Gaza, they with military precaution kept their head-quarters at the mouth of the Plain of Jezreel, so as to hold secure the line by which they should retire with their booty. The whole population of Israel fled to the hills and mountain fastnesses and caves, whither the dromedary men could not pursue them ; but even these were not safe from marauding parties, for they were fain to hide their wheat as they thrashed it, doubtless in the " silos," or underground plastered granaries, which their successors on the confines of the desert use even to this day. Such a visitation remained stamped on the memories of the nation, as is seen by references to the great victories of Gideon, in psalmist and prophet, centuries after the event The rallying point of the champions of Israel was this time in the fastnesses to the south of the plain, as the chieftain selected by God for his deliverance was of this region of Manasseh, while the northern heroes in the struggle against Sisera had naturally musterec on Mount Tabor on the opposite side. The cliffs of Mount Gilboa, honeycombed with caves, afforded safe retreat. The copious spring at their base forms a fine pool, of considerabl- extent, and doubtless many a long file of camels had there been watered, for the hea quarters of the invaders' camp was just in front of it. Down from their hiding-place und cover of night Gideon and his men crept unobserved to this pool, and there the chieftan tested his men, and retained only the sifted three hundred, and from that day the Po Gilboa was known as the " Fountain of Trembling" (Harod) (see page 267). The enen were "beneath him," yet on the hill Moreh. To one standing on the spot, the rising grox or slope of Tubaun, just to the north, suggests itself as the place for the camp. Hit ei the next night Gideon and his servant cautiously descend, and hanging undetected on outskirts of the camp, hear a Midianite telling his dream to his comrades as they try to ^ themselves awake by the embers of the watch-fire. Evidently the daring of the " fellahin,