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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 270
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 270. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 270. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2479

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 270, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 270
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_290.jpg
Transcript 27o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. defeated host, the terrified horses vainly struggling in the swamp and treading down the fugitives, till the general himself was fain to abandon his chariot, and fly on foot and unattended, by one of the paths behind Nazareth towards the Northern Hazor. Three thousand two hundred years of history had passed and gone, when that plain saw a similar battle between hosts almost as unequal in numbers, if not in equipment, with an identical result. Little more than four miles to the north-west we may detect a mound in the plain on the direct road to Nazareth, covered with ruins, and on the other side of it a small swamp, sometimes a lake, the resort of wild fowl, where flocks of the stilted plover daintily step. The mound with a few huts behind it clustered round a well is known as El Fuleh, the " Bean," and marks the site of the Crusading castle of Faba, an important garrison of the Knights Templar, the foundations of which are still plainly visible. Round this spot in the beginning of April, 1799, the Turks had collected a vast army--Mamelukes from Egypt, Janissaries from Damascus, regulars from Aleppo, with the whole Mohammedan population of Syria, and countless hordes of Arab cavalry, which even outnumbered the foot levies, from the whole east of Jordan and Northern Arabia—for the purpose of forcing Napoleon to raise the siege of Acre, then held by the aid of Sir Sydney Smith. The Turkish general was in the same position as Sisera. He was compelled to camp in the plain, or at least to hold his cavalry there for the sake of water. The little handful of French held, like Barak, the hill country to the north. Junot held Mount Tabor and Nazareth, other detachments held Cana of Galilee and Safed, while Murat with one thousand men held the bridge across the Jordan, to intercept the enemy's communications. Kleber held the supreme command, and, mustering all his troops at Nazareth, marched as far as Fuleh to the attack. Here he was assailed by fifteen thousand cavalry and as many infantry. Forming in squares, the French soon were behind ramparts of dead men and horses, till, after they had held their ground for six hours, Napoleon, who had been working his way with the besieging army from before Acre by the edge of the southern hills, came suddenly down from Taanach and Megiddo, and by his dashing charges decided the fate of the day. The Turkish cavalry was driven into the swamps of the head-waters of the Kishon, in which Sisera's chariots had stuck fast, and they then fled towards Mount Tabor and the Jordan, by the route that Sisera's fugitives must have followed towards Harosheth ; but, finding Murat holding the bridge (Jisr Mejami'a), endeavoured to ford the swollen Jordan, in which numbers perished, and the army, "countless as the sands of the sea, utterly dispersed. Napoleon returned by the banks of the Kishon to resume the siege Acre; but soon found his victory a barren one, and, baffled by a few hundred men, was to lead his army back by the coast to Jaffa and Egypt. We cannot forget how constant ] in after life he recurred to the events of that April on this plain, and bitterly exclaim that here Sir Sydney Smith had marred his destiny. He held, with other military geogra phers, that through this plain and across the Jordan was the natural access to Damasc from Damascus to the Euphrates, and thence to India.