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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 266
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 266. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2475.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 266. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2475

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 266, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2475.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 266
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_286.jpg
Transcript PICTURESOUE PALESTINE. 200 insure s the perennial fertility of the valley. The site was well chosen as a royal residence, for it is easily defensible on the north and east, and commands a clear unbroken view almost to Jordan on the one side, and to Carmel on the other, while in front the whole plain tretches to Nazareth and the foot of Tabor. But there is nothing to mark its bygone importance. The desolate heaps have crumbled into turf-covered hillocks and one large mound. A few flat-topped hovels clustering round a tower, not very ancient, and which occupies probably the site of the old Migdol, or watch-tower, are all that make up modern Jezreel. Not a tree or a shrub relieves the monotony of the valley of old Jezreel; we see only innumerable cisterns and many marble sarcophagi strewn about, some of them still perfect, many finely sculptured with figures of the crescent moon, the symbol of Ashtaroth. These are the only relics of its ancient beauty, all that is left by which we can say, " This is Jezreel " (see pages 264 and 265). There is no trace of the royal gardens nor a vestige of a vineyard on the hillside. We may guess, however, where they were— probably the royal grounds sloping down the little valley to the east—for we may be sure the vineyard of Naboth was on the hillside, the vine never being cultivated in the plain. It must have been on the way up to the city, for it was as the King was riding with Jehu and Bidkar behind him, that Elijah met him and rebuked him, on the very spot itself where again Jehu encountered his son Joram on his way up from the Jordan, by the road from Bethshean. From the town, any parties coming from beyond the Jordan, could be easily descried, and as we stand there the whole history is brought vividly before our eyes. For miles we can trace the road up from the Jordan Valley by the side of the little stream, the Nahr Jalud, where the watchman recognised, in the charioteer dashing furiously along, the impetuous Jehu. It was on the same side also that Jezebel looked out of the window, and, knowing that there was no mercy in store for herself, bitterly taunted him. Just below must have been the open space by the gate of the city, the resort of the eastern scavengers, the pariah dogs, to which the Queen was thrown. Turning to the south, we have almost as clear a view of the ascent up which the panic-stricken Ahaziah vainly pressed his horses, pursued by the victorious rebel. While no locality in the land has been more indisputably identified than Zerin, there is scarcely, even in this land of ruins, a destruction more complete and utter than that of Jezreel. As we stand here, under the shadow of Mount Gilboa, looking.down the smooth slope which opens the great thoroughfare to Gilead by Bethshean, itself out of sight; and then turning north, behold the bell-shaped dome of Tabor, with the snowy peaks of Hermon just visible in the blue haze beyond it, the little village of Shunem in the plain, and Nazareth with its white minarets and towers rising on its edge; while in the far east, a low wooded elevation pushes from the north and cuts the plain in two, shutting out the Plain of Acre and the sea; then following its line, the eye detects the opening through which Kishon wends its way seaward, close under Mount Carmel, and from the bold bluff which marks the face of Carmel note the gradually receding hills, sheltering some historic name in every dell-we may recall the story of many a battle which could have been watched from our post of observation.