Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 257
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 257. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 257. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2466

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 257, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 257
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_277.jpg
Transcript ■ ——. 4^hhbh^hhbibh^^hh SEBASTE. 257 cultv It is plumed off with great nicety. Then each lamb is carefully examined lest there be any blemish. The right forelegs and entrails are removed and burnt with the wool. The lambs are rubbed with salt and spitted, and then forced into the glowing oven. A wooden trellis is placed over the top and covered with damp turf to keep in all the heat. In the meantime, unleavened cakes seasoned with bitter herbs are distributed by the chief priest. Soon afterwards nearly every one present retires to rest, except the twelve white- robed men, who return to their original station within the enclosed space, and continue recitino- and chanting by the light of the full moon until midnight, when the sleepers are aroused, and in the presence of all the men of the community the lambs are withdrawn from the oven and carried in new straw baskets to the enclosed space, where they are eaten " in haste," each man having " his loins girt and a staff in his hand." There are slight variations from year to year in the manner of celebrating this festival, but none of great importance. The plateau on the summit of Gerizim is two thousand eight hundred and forty feet above the level of the sea. It is crowned by a little Moslem wely which stands among the ruins of a fortress built by Justinian in the sixth century to protect, from the fury of the Samaritans, the church which had been erected there by Zeno. The foundations of this church, octagonal in form, have been traced. This possibly marks the site of the temple; but the " Holy Place " of the Samaritans is shown near to the edge of the plateau on the south side, and not far from it is a trough called the place of Abraham's sacrifice (see page 234). But we must hasten onwards to Samaria. Leaving Nablus by its western gate (see page 249), we follow the course of a mill stream which runs towards the west through cultivated fields and gardens. Presently the road takes a north-westerly direction, winding among rounded hills, many of which are terraced and crowned with villages. In less than two hours we enter a large and fertile basin-shaped valley surrounded by high hills. Nearly in the centre stands an isolated and less lofty hill, which, however, is one thousand four hundred and fifty-four feet above the sea-level; it is united to the hills on the eastern side of the basin by a low undulating ridge. Omri, King of Israel, bought this beautifully situated hill, of Shemer, its owner, for two talents of silver, and the city he built upon it he called Shemeron (Samaria), (1 Kings xvi. 24). After many vicissitudes it was given by the Emperor Augustus to Herod the Great, who built a splendid city here, to which he gave the name of Sebaste. The cities of Omri and Herod are now represented by an unimportant village called Sebustieh, which stands on the eastern side of the hill. The houses are rudely constructed of ancient materials; entablatures, fragments of columns, and massive stones being used indiscriminately by the peasant builders. The only ancient structure standing is a twelfth-century church dedicated to St. John the Baptist, now used as a mosque. The walls, except on the south side, are very much dilapidated, and the roof has disappeared. Within the spacious enclosure there is a Moslem sanctuary with a domed roof built over a crypt hewn in the solid rock, to which we descend by twenty-one steep steps. Here the guardian of the shrine shows a stone slab under which it is said the Neby Yahiha (John the Baptist) 34