Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 250
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 250. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 250. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2459

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 250, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 250
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_270.jpg
Transcript 25o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. The chief trade of Nablus is in wool, cotton, olive oil, and soap of excellent quality. There are no less than twenty soap factories in the city. A native of Nablus will sometimes offer a present of soap to a friend living in a less favoured district, saying, " I bring you soap made of the purest olive oil that your face may shine upon me;" or, " I bring you some soap that your heart may be clean towards me." At Nablus goat-skins in great numbers are converted into khirbehs for carrying water. Sometimes the floor of this khan may be seen half covered with the inflated skins laid out for seasoning. Returning to the arcade, we pursue our way westward through narrow bazaars, where smiths, carpenters, weavers, tailors, and shoemakers may be seen at work; then, turning southward, we traverse tortuous lanes and gloomy streets, arched at intervals and built over in many places, till we reach a passage which leads us out of the town just opposite to the terraced gardens on the slopes of Gerizim, where flourish all "the precious fruits brought forth by the sun" (see Deut. xxxiii. 14). Oranges, lemons, figs, apricots, pomegranates, mulberries, walnuts, grapes, and almonds follow each other in due season, and hedges of cactus afford the cooling fruit commonly called prickly pear. On one of these garden terraces Jotham, perhaps, stood when he cried, " Hearken unto me, ye men of Shechem," and spoke his parable of the fruit-trees and the bramble, with olive, fig-trees, and vines around him, and thorns and brambles overgrowing the garden landmarks (Judges ix. 7—21). From a certain point in these gardens, looking towards the north-east, an excellent general view is obtained of the city, a faithful representation of which is given on page 249. From nearly the same standpoint, turning towards the north-west, we see the outline of the western heights of Ebal, and in the foreground the tall square tower (remarkably like the White Tower of Ramleh) which adjoins the Mosque El Khadra, the Green Mosque, another appropriated church of the Crusaders (see page 247). In the front of this tower a slab is fixed, on which there is a Samaritan inscription. The Samaritans state that they once had a synagogue on this spot, which is popularly known as the Mukam Hizn Yakub, that is, " The Place of the Mourning of Jacob," for, according to local tradition, it was here that Jacob stood when the coat of his beloved son Joseph was brought to him, and where, believing him to be dead, " he mourned for him many days." A very old mulberry-tree stands in the court of the mosque, the representative of one which is said to have withered when the death of Joseph was reported, and became green again when he was found to be living. Not far from the summit of the mountain peak which appears in the illustration behind the tower, there stands a Moslem mukam called 'Amad ed Din (the Pillar of Faith), which gives its name to this part of the mountain range. It has been suggested that this may mark the site of the altar erected by Joshua on Mount Ebal; it is, however, locally regarded as the resting- place of a Moslem saint so named, said to have lived about four hundred years ago. On the slope of the nearer hill, there is a greatly revered shrine of a Moslem female saint named Sitti Eslamiyeh, the Lady of Eslam ; from her Mount Ebal derives its present name, Jebel Eslamiyeh. The highest point of the mountain, which is three thousand and thirty-two feet above the level of the sea, is more easterly, and not shown in the illustration. Turning away