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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 248
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 248. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2456.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 248. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2456

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 248, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2456.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 248
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_267.jpg
Transcript 248 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. The town, which is about three-quarters of a mile long, is built on the water-shed in the narrowest part of the valley, where it is eighteen hundred and seventy-seven feet above the level of the sea, and only one hundred yards wide. It is said that there are no less than eighty springs of water in and about Nablus, each having its special name. The water is conveyed from these springs to the mosques and other public buildings and to private houses, and then irrigates the gardens in and around the city. Many of the streets have little channels of clear water running through them. After being thus utilised, the streams on the western side of the city are allowed to unite and form a stream which turns several mills and flows towards the Mediterranean; those on the eastern side irrigate the gardens east of the town, and then, with a rather abrupt fall, flow towards the river Jordan. There are no very ancient buildings in Nablus, and scarcely anything remains to remind us of the " New City " of Flavius but the mutilated vestige of its name. The Crusaders, however, have left several memorials of their influence here. We at once recognise their work in the facade of the principal mosque, which was originally a church dedicated to St. John. It is at the eastern end of the city, and is called Jamia el Kebir (the Great Mosque). The chief entrance consists of a deeply recessed pointed arch resting on short columns, five on each side, with foliated and varied capitals (see page 245). In the central court there are several ancient columns of Egyptian granite. From this point we enter the bazaars, which are better built and kept in better order than those of Jerusalem. Those, however, in which vegetables and prepared food are sold are rather difficult to traverse during certain hours of the day. Turkish soldiers hurry by, some of them carrying large metal dishes containing a melange of chopped vegetables, or deep earthenware plates filled with stiff cold pottage made of peas or beans and garnished with slices of lemon floating in oil; others push their way through the crowd with bowls of steaming soup held at arm's length before them, which very effectually clears the way. There are small arcades especially devoted to the sale of tobacco, others which are filled with the refreshing odour of green lemons, oranges, citrons, and shaddocks. The long narrow bazaar, where dried fruits, olives, rice, cheese, and butter are sold, leads to another Christian church of the twelfth century, now converted into a mosque called Jamia el Nisr, the Mosque of the Eagle. Here also are some ancient granite columns. Making a detour through a street almost blocked up with camels, we pass into the principal bazaar, the finest arcade in Palestine. Here European goods are displayed, such as Manchester cottons, printed calicoes, Sheffield cutlery, Bohemian glasses for narghilehs, and crockery and trinkets of all kinds from Marseilles. But the brightest shops are those in which Damascus and Aleppo silks, embroidered jackets, and crimson tarbushes appear, with stores of Turkish pipes, and amber rosaries from Stamboul, and glass bracelets from Hebron. An opening in this arcade leads into the old khan on the north side of the city, the Khan of the Merchants (Khan Tujjar). It consists of an extensive square space enclosed by a two-storied range of buildings. A stone stairway leads to the terraced roof, from whence there is an interesting view in every direction.