Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 246
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 246. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2454.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 246. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2454

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 246, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2454.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 246
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_265.jpg
Transcript 246 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and olive-groves and orchards, above which the mosques and minarets and white house-tops of Nablus appear, rather more than half a mile distant. We pass the spring of Defneh (Daphne) and then the new barracks, to build which many of the stones of the ruins around Jacob's Well were carried away. A distant view of this long white building is shown in the illustration on page 237. Here the valley seems to widen again, for the steep slope of Gerizim is broken by a deep wady which forms a vast natural amphitheatre. Immediately opposite there is a corresponding ravine reaching almost to the summit of Ebal. It has been conjectured by several writers that it was here that Joshua, after having taken possession of the Promised Land, assembled the tribes of Israel, and having erected an altar on Mount Ebal and offered sacrifices thereon, he read the blessings and the curses, and all that is written in the book of the law, before all the congregation of Israel. It would be difficult to find a more appropriate spot for the celebration of the solemn ceremonies described in Deut. xxvii. and Joshua viii. 30—35. We may imagine the Ark of the Covenant placed in the centre of the valley where the four ways meet, guarded by the priests, " the sons of Levi." And all the tribes of Israel, their elders, officers, and judges, on this side and that side of the ark, half of them ranged on the slopes of the picturesque reft of Gerizim responding joyously to the promised blessings, the other half standing on the rock ledges and mounds of the grand gorge of Ebal re-echoing the threatened curses, while loud " Amens," uttered simultaneously by the whole congregation at regular intervals, resounded from hill to hill. But the scene changes. The Ark of the Covenant is lost and the children of Israel are scattered. Instead of the ark, we see in the middle of the valley a few Bedouin tents and laden camels, and groups of Arab labourers at work in fields and orchards; instead of the tribes of Israel, we see little detachments of Turkish soldiers hurrying towards the new barracks at the entrance to the gorge of Gerizim, the lower part of which is well cultivated and planted with trees, for, unlike the opposite wady of Ebal, it is well provided with water. Here in an enclosed garden is the little Moslem shrine already referred to, called Jamia el 'Amud, the Mosque of the Pillar, where forty Jewish prophets are said to be buried. Black goats, seemingly innumerable, are leisurely climbing up the gorge of Ebal, steadily following their leader and browsing on the scanty and prickly pasture that springs up among the rocks and stones. It is only at this point, however, that there is any marked difference with regard to fertility between the " Mountain of Blessing" and the " Mountain of Cursing." Many experiments have been made here to ascertain at what distance the human voice can be heard singly and in chorus ; the results have often created surprise. Peasants, and especially shepherds and goatherds, often call to each other from hill to hill, and even contrive to carry on a conversation where favourable positions have been discovered. We hasten onwards, with Gerizim on our left and Ebal a little farther off on our right, but they are gradually approaching each other. We cross and recross winding streams and artificial water-courses in gardens and cultivated fields, then pass through picturesque