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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 244
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 244. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 244. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2452

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 244, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 244
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_263.jpg
Transcript - 244 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. soon heard plunging into the water far below." Jacob esh Shellaby was let down into the well by means of ropes supplemented by two long shawls, which formed the turbans of two Samaritans who were present. The well was fortunately dry, and after some searching among the stones (which are constantly being thrown into it by travellers), the Bible was found and conveyed safely to Dr. Wilson, to his very great satisfaction. It was currently believed in Nablus that it was a book of necromancy for the recovery of which so much trouble had been taken. The well was at that time, 1843, found to be "exactly seventy-five feet deep," consequently if the measurements made in 1838 were accurate, debris to the amount of thirty feet had collected in the well in the short space of five years! In the month of May, 1866, Captain Anderson, R.E., in order to thoroughly examine the well, caused himself to be lowered into it by means of a knotted rope. He states that the mouth of the well has a narrow opening "just wide enough to allow the body of a man to pass through with arms uplifted ; this narrow neck, which is about four feet long, resembling the neck of a bottle, opens out into the well itself, which is cylindrical, and about seven feet six inches in diameter. The mouth and upper part of the well are built of masonry, and the well appears to have been sunk through a mixture of alluvial soil and limestone fragments, till a compact bed of limestone was reached, having horizontal strata which could be easily worked, and the interior of the well presents the appearance of being lined with rough masonry." The depth was the same as it was in 1843, namely, seventy-five feet, and when Lieutenant Conder measured it in 1877 he found no alteration. Probably this represents not much more than half the original depth of the well, for it was " undoubtedly sunk for the purpose of securing, even in exceptionally dry seasons, a supply of water, which at great depths would always be filtering through the sides of the well, and would collect at the bottom." Captain Anderson's descent into the well was rather a perilous one, for he fainted during the process of lowering. As the rope had fortunately been securely and skilfully lashed round his waist, and his feet rested in a loop, he reached the bottom safely though unconsciously. Suddenly he heard the people shouting to him from above, and when he began to move he found himself lying on his back at the bottom of the well, from whence " the opening at the mouth looked like a star." Fortunately his ascent was accomplished in safety. From Jacob's Well the road, evidently an ancient one, takes a north-westerly direction, skirting the base of Gerizim. On the right is the ancient pasture-land of Jacob and his descendants, now well cultivated, and yielding abundant harvests of wheat and barley, and a good supply of beans, lentils, sesamum, cotton, and tobacco, and a wealth of wild flowers on every uncultivated patch of ground, especially mallows and anemones of many colours and ranunculi (see page 230). A spur of Gerizim runs northward as if to meet a corresponding but less developed spur advancing southward from Ebal, the twin mountain opposite; the point of their nearest approach is the true entrance to the Valley of Shechem. As we follow the path, which takes a westerly direction round the northern extremity of Gerizim, the whole length of the valley comes suddenly into sight, with its terraced hillsides, its running streams,