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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 241
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 241. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 241. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2449

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 241, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 241
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_260.jpg
Transcript jUtfMMtfHl^B 'AWERTAH. 241 teen or eighteen inches in diameter, and resemble rude altars, their summits being slightly hollowed. In the shallow basins thus formed I have seen traces of fire, as if votive offerings had recently been burnt there. It is said that small objects, such as kerchiefs of embroidered muslin or silk shawls and other trifles, are occasionally sacrificed at this tomb by Jews. The burial of Joseph in Shechem is recorded in Joshua xxiv. 32, and the next verse states that " Eleazar the son of Aaron died; and they buried him in a hill that pertained to Phinehas his son, which was given him in Mount Ephraim." About three miles and a half due south of Joseph's Tomb stands the picturesque and flourishing little village of 'Awertah, surrounded by extensive olive-groves and fig-orchards. Numerous rock-cut tombs, cisterns, and wine-presses, unused for centuries, prove 'Awertah to be a very ancient place. It is regarded with great veneration by Moslems, Jews, and Samaritans, for here, according to the Samaritan chronicle, are " the tombs of the holy priests Eleazar and Phinehas." 'Awertah was inhabited by the Samaritans until the seventh century of our era. It is now occupied exclusively by Moslems. They, however, not only guard the sacred tombs reverently and keep them in good repair, but willingly and with evident pride point them out to passing travellers. The traditional tomb of Phinehas (Kubr el 'Azeirat) is a rude structure of stone and plaster, about fourteen feet in length and seven and a half in breadth, with a high gabled top (see page 238). The tomb of Eleazar (El 'Azeir) is on a mound on the west side of the village, in a large paved court, in a corner of which there is a mosque dedicated to a Moslem sheikh. This tomb is eighteen feet three inches in length and fifteen feet and a half in breadth. A low stone wall immediately surrounds it, and a grand old terebinth-tree overshadows it. A large jar of coarse pottery is generally kept here, filled with water for the use of pilgrims (see page 242). In nearly every mukam, or shrine, held sacred by the Moslem, this welcome refreshment is provided either by endowment or by the dwellers in the neighbourhood, as a means of propitiating the goodwill of the saint or prophet to whom it is dedicated. On entering one of these sacred enclosures it is customary to say " Destur ya Sheikh! " or " Destur ya Neby!" —that is, u Permission, O Sheikh ! " or, " Permission, O Prophet! " as the case may be. Every village in Palestine has its sacred " place; " sometimes marked only by a heap of stones or by a venerable tree on which votive offerings are suspended, but more generally by a whitewashed structure of plaster and stone, surmounted by a dome (kubbeh), built over the grave of a famous chieftain or a revered "wely," that is, a Moslem saint—in which case the building itself is familiarly called a "wely." Similar structures are erected on spots connected with traditions relating to heroes and prophets and saints of old, including Pagans, Hebrews, Samaritans, and Christians. A building of this kind is called in Arabic a " mukam; " that is, a station, literally a " place," like the corresponding Hebrew word " makom." Local traditions thus preserved, have in many instances assisted explorers in the recovery of Biblical sites. The entrance to these sacred enclosures is rarely provided with a door, and yet peasants often deposit their ploughs and other implements and tools within a mukam, or 32