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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 240
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 240. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2448.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 240. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2448

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 240, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2448.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 240
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_259.jpg
Transcript 240 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. And Shechem must have been regarded as a specially favoured and hallowed spot in patriarchal times. It was the first halting-place of Abraham after he had passed over the Jordan and entered the land of Canaan, and the first altar erected to Jehovah in the Promised Land was that which Abraham then built at the " place " of Shechem among the oak-trees of Moreh, where it is said " the Lord appeared unto him " (Gen. xii. 6, 7). To this neighbourhood, and probably to the same camping ground, Jacob in after years was attracted. " And Jacob came to Shalem, a city of Shechem" (Gen. xxxiii. 18). About three miles to the east of Shechem there is a little village called Salim. It is plentifully supplied with " living water" from two sources, one of which is called 'Ain Kebir, the Great Fountain. Probably Salim is the modern representative of the city near to which John the Baptist found a convenient place for baptizing his disciples, " because there was much water there" (John iii. 23). This village, Salim, represented on page 237, has also been pointed out as Shalem, the "city of Shechem " to which "Jacob came; " although the highest authorities among Hebrew scholars and annotators of the Bible agree that Shalem does not in this passage indicate the name of a place, but simply means "safe," like the Arabic word Salim, and the verse should be read thus : " And Jacob came safe to the city of Shechem and pitched his tent before the city. And he bought a parcel of a field, where he had spread his tent, at the hand of Hamor the Hivite, prince of the country, for a hundred pieces of money." Here he dwelt with Leah and Rachel, and their handmaidens and men-servants and women-servants ; his wealth, like that of a Bedouin chieftain of the present day, consisting of " flocks and herds and camels." That the "parcel of ground" acquired by Jacob was situated at the eastern entrance to the Valley of Shechem (see page 237), where it widens and meets the Plain of Mukhnah, there seems to be very little doubt, for here, at the foot of Mount Gerizim, we find the deep and unquestionably ancient well which bears his name (see page 230), and a quarter of a mile to the north of it, exactly opposite Nablus, the ancient Shechem, stands the traditional tomb of Joseph, Israel's beloved son. The illustration on page 231 does not show the interior of the irregularly shaped little court which encloses the tomb, so a few words must be added in description of it. From the entrance, in the north wall, a narrow, irregular, and rudely paved path leads to a Moslem prayer niche in the south wall. In the southwest corner, at about five feet from the ground, there is a splay in which is formed a round- headed niche, in the direction of the site of the Samaritan temple on Mount Gerizim, the Kibleh of the Samaritans. On the east side of the path there is a raised dais about seven inches high, for the use of devotees who come to rest, or read, or pray. Opposite to it on the west side of the path the tomb itself appears on a raised base. It is a clumsy-looking simple structure of stone and plaster, about three feet high and seven feet long, and as it is not parallel with the west wall, near to which it stands, the effect is very peculiar. The top terminates in a blunt-pointed ridge. At the head and the foot a rudely formed pillar of plastered stone is set up, about the same height as the tomb. These pillars are seven-