Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 236
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 236. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2444.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 236. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2444

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 236, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2444.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 236
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_255.jpg
Transcript 23& PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. accounted for were it not for the jealousy with which—as we learn from the Book of Genesis— the old Canaanites preserved their rights to the springs. For his own use, on his own land, the patriarch dug the well, leaving the fountains in possession of the native inhabitants. As we approach the spot we see a dusty patch of ground within a brokendown stone wall. Scattered stones and mounds of rubbish cover the plot, and the shafts of three granite columns stand up in the middle, their bases buried underground. At length we find a hole, in the roof of a little modern vault about twenty feet long east and west, with a pointed arch. The floor is piled with the debris of the roof, and the well-mouth is choked, but the well itself, seventy-five feet deep, and seven feet six inches in diameter, is quite clear (see page 230). The ruins which surround the well are those of an ancient church. In another small vault to the north-west, now closed, the tesselated pavement may still be seen, and the bases of the pillars already noticed. In 383 a.d. Sta. Paula visited the church ; in 700 a.d. Arculphus gives a rude plan of it as cruciform. It was standing in the eighth century, and was rebuilt in the twelfth; for Theodoras, in 1172, speaks of the well as enclosed in the church—just as Sta. Paula found it—before the high altar. Even as late as 1550 an altar stood in the vault, and the site still belongs to the Greek church. Looking northward from the well, we see the dome of the little mosque by Joseph's Tomb—a site mentioned from the earliest time by travellers, Jewish, Samaritan, or Christian, and venerated by all sects alike— the companion of Jacob's Well, and probably as genuine a site, being authorised by that rare consent of various traditions which is found especially in respect to places near Shechem. The tomb stands in a little courtyard adjoining the ruined kubbeh, and is surrounded by plastered walls, renewed—as an inscription in English, on the south wall, tells us—by Consul Rogers, the friend of the Samaritans, in 1868. At either end of the rude cenotaph is a pillar on which lamps may be placed; and the monument must be older than, from its rude construction, would be supposed, for in 1564 Rabbi Vri, of Biel, gives a sketch of Joseph's Tomb which would correctly represent the present structure with its pillars. Jew, Samaritan, Moslem, and Christian venerate the site alike, although Josephus says that the bones of Joseph were carried to Hebron, and Saewulf notices, in 1100 a.d., the same supposed tomb, which is still shown attached to the outer wall of the Hebron haram (see page 231). On the side of Ebal, above Joseph's Tomb, is the rude hamlet of 'Askar, with its rock-cut channel leading to the spring and its ancient sepulchres. The old Samaritan name for the place is Ischar, almost identical in sound with the Sychar which is mentioned in our version of the fourth Gospel. Jerome and other authorities, indeed, support the reading which substitutes Shechem for Sychar, and Dr. Robinson has proposed the theory that Sychar means " drunken," and was a Jewish nickname for the Samaritan capital. The spelling of the old Samaritan name shows, however, that the derivation was from another root, meaning " to surround;" and Shechem is too far from Jacob's Well to fit the narrative of Christ's conversation with the Samaritan woman. Nor is the expression, " Sychar, a city of Samaria/ likely to have been used by a Jewish author with reference to the famous Shechem which