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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 235
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 235. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2443.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 235. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2443

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 235, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2443.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 235
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_254.jpg
Transcript — ^—i——■ fMfPVBBPHMB1 BALATA. 235 corn-land, with small olive groves covering the low rocky swells which rise from the plain and form sites for the villages. The present name Mukhnah is taken from the ruin of the old Samaritan town so called on the slope of Gerizim, and means " the camp." The Samaritans call it Merj-el-Baha, "the Flat Meadow," and identify it with the plain of Moreh, mentioned in the Bible as near Shechem. In the middle of the plain stands the village of 'Awertah, on rising ground among the olives, and well supplied with water. Here in the village itself is the ancient monument called by the Samaritans the tomb of Phinehas; and on the west, shaded by a magnificent terebinth growing in the paved courtyard, is the domed tomb-house of Eleazar, with a Samaritan inscription of the last century. Ithamar is also said to be buried with Abishua not far off. The village mosque is, however, consecrated to a Moslem sheikh. There seems little doubt that 'Awertah represents Gibeah Phinehas in Mount Ephraim, where Eleazar, the son of Aaron, and his family were buried. The Samaritans called the place Kefr Awerah and Abeartha, and the mediaeval Jewish travellers all notice the tombs of Eleazar, Phinehas, and Ithamar, the latter as lying among the olives below the village. Rabbi Gerson also describes a vaulted chamber, as yet unknown to modern travellers, where the seventy elders were entombed. Following the path worn in the white chalk along the feet of Gerizim, we pass by the spring of Sarina, to which a Samaritan legend similar to the story of Susanna attaches, and descend to the Vale of Shechem, west of the little village of Balata, with its fig garden and clear spring. Balata is one of the cities the importance of which is little recognised. Jerome identifies it with the oak of Shechem, which was by the Holy Place of Jehovah ; and the Samaritans give to the spot the names Ailon-Tubah and Shejr el Kheir, " Holy Oak," or " Tree of Grace." This sacred tree appears more than once in the Old Testament history; first, perhaps, as the oak of Moreh beside the makom, or " place," of Shechem, where Abraham built his first altar ; and again as the oak where Jacob hid the teraphim ; apparently the same tree which was by the Sanctuary of the Lord, or altar El-Elohe-Israel, erected by Jacob on the parcel of ground which he bought from the children of Hamor. By this oak Joshua erected a great stone, which is noticed later as "the monument" by the oak of Shechem; and the Oak of the Meonenim, or soothsayers, near Shechem, is not improbably the same place. The tradition which fixes the site of this sanctuary farther west, at the little " Mosque of the Pillar," appears to be more modern, and, with several other sites round Shechem and on Ebal, seems to belong to the Crusading topography which connected Ebal and Gerizim with the Dan and Bethel of Jeroboam's calf-worship. This ancient sanctuary, the site of the first oak-tree beneath which the father of the Hebrews spread his tent in the promised land, and of the first "place," or makom, where he erected an altar, is naturally to be sought in the immediate vicinity of the well dug by his grandson Jacob; and the undisputed site of that well is to be found immediately east of Balata. Not only is the Bir Y'akub the only well anywhere in the neighbourhood, but its existence so close to beautiful springs of water gushing out at the feet of Gerizim could scarcely be