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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 234
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 234. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2442.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 234. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2442

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 234, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2442.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 234
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_253.jpg
Transcript = 234 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. immediately north of it, we cross into the region of Samaria and become concerned with Samaritan traditions and topography. The fine oak-tree near the spring of Khan Sawieh is one of the few large trees of Southern Palestine, the number of which can almost be counted on the fingers. Three species of oak exist in Syria, of which the evergreen oak attains the largest size, and is called ballut in Arabic. The second species, called siudidn and afsy forms a brushwood of prickly shrubs eio-ht to twelve feet in height; and the third, the gall oak, grows as a small tree twenty feet high, called generally malliil, but sometimes sindidn. The large single oaks, like Abraham's oak at Hebron, are rare, but the gall oak is very common in parts of Galilee, growing in thick woods and open glades west of Nazareth, on Tabor, near the sources of Jordan, and in the northern part of the plain of Sharon. The second species flourishes in the copses which cover the hard limestone of the spurs west of the watershed, but never occurs in the soft chalky districts, which are bare of brushwood. From the oak tree of Khan Sawieh we now march outward into Samaria, and gain the crest of a ridge whence Gerizim and the Mukhnah plain are distinctly visible. We enter upon a region of sacred tombs, and find the old heroes of the Hebrew invasion lying buried round the Mount of Blessing. Were these sites only venerated by the Samaritans, we might feel doubtful of their authentic character, but Jew and Christian agree in pointing to the same sites for the tombs of Joshua, Caleb, and Nun, Phinehas, Eleazar, and Ithamar, and that of Joseph rather farther north. The modern Samaritans identify Timnath Heres, where Joshua was buried, with the village Kefr Haris, on the hills south of Gerizim, where are three square domed buildings, sacred respectively to Neby Lush'a, Neby Nun, and Neby Kifl (an historic character of the age of the Prophet). In the fourth century St. Jerome apparently speaks of this same place in describing the route of Sta. Paula, in connection with the other sacred tombs lying in this district, and as being still venerated. "Much she wondered," he writes, " that the divider of the possessions should have chosen for himself a lot so rugged and mountainous." A remark which applies well to the rough mountains round Kefr Haris. In the fourteenth century Marino Sanuto makes Kefr Haris and the tomb of Joshua in correct position on his map, but the Jewish descriptions of the place are still more important. Rabbi Jacob, of Paris, in 1258, notices the three tombs of Joshua, Caleb, and Nun at Kefr Haris. Estori Parchi gives the distance from Shechem as two leagues. Rabbi Gerson, of Scarmela, in 1561, speaks of the monuments over the tombs, and of the caruba and pomegranate trees growing beside them. And finally, in 1564, Rabbi Uri, of Biel, gives a sketch showing three domed buildings with two trees, and lights burning inside the domes. As regards these sepulchres, we have thus an accord between four distinct lines of tradition, and the existence of the name of Mount Heres in the modern form of Haris. The plain called El Mukhnah, which we now approach, is a plateau larger than any previously crossed, though smaller than the watershed plains north of Shechem (see page 237). It measures about nine miles north and south, by four miles east and west, and consists of