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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 229
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 229. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 229. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2438

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 229, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 229
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_249.jpg
Transcript SHILOH. 229 Samaria ; the northern (Wady Kanah) is probably the brook Kanah, which divided the lot of Ephraim from that of Manasseh. Both valleys form a junction near Ras-el-'Ain, and the great pools beside that ruin are those fed by the rainfall from an area of four hundred square miles of mountain country. But on reaching the plateau near Sinjil the traveller will probably make a detour to the east, in order to visit the secluded ruin of Seilun, the Shiloh of the Old Testament. An ancient causeway leads up the slope of a chalky hill from the open plain of Turmus 'Ayya. Gaining the saddle, the traveller sees in front of him a grey ruin of tumbledown stone huts clustering round the side of a kind of knoll. In the low ground near the approach is a flat-roofed building shaded by a large oak ; this is called Jami'a-el-Yetaim, " Mosque of the Worshippers." On the right, higher up, is another square structure, roofless and half ruinous, with some smaller trees. This is called Jami'a-el-Arb'ain, " Mosque of the Forty " (Companions of the Prophet). A little tank with steps is seen close to the first-mentioned building. The view is restricted on either side by hills, and north of the ruins rises a long barren ridge of grey limestone, with a few scattered fig-trees. Immediately behind the knoll of the ruined village is a deep valley. Several tombs are cut in the rock on either side of the town, and a fine spring, with some rock-cut sepulchres, exists about three-quarters of a mile to the east, near the valley head. The site, remote from the main road, and hidden in the bosom of the hills, is so secluded that it might easily escape the notice even of a careful explorer; and it is not surprising that for so many centuries it remained altogether unknown, though still preserving its ancient name among the villagers who, until quite of late years, inhabited the place. The " Mosque of the Forty," which is reached before arriving at the ruined village, is a building of puzzling character. It has been constructed at different periods, and used for different purposes. The mosque itself is a small chamber of inferior masonry, built against the eastern wall of the ancient structure, with a small mihrab, or prayer recess, towards the south. The main building is a square of thirty-seven feet side, with solid walls of good masonry, the door being to the north. The doorway is spanned by a flat lintel, having on it a representation, in low relief, of a vase flanked by two wreaths ; and the design resembling those on the Galilean synagogues, and almost identical with that over an ancient rock-cut tomb some few miles off at Beita, is of the character which belongs to the Jewish art of the later period, from Herod to Hadrian ; and though possibly not in situ, we can have little hesitation in identifying the lintel as of Jewish origin (see page 226). The remains of four pillars, which seem to have supported the roof, are visible among the thorns and weeds inside the monument; and a sloping scarp—apparently a later addition—is built against the wall on the outside. Isaac Chelo, of Aragon, almost the only traveller, Jewish or Christian, who mentions Seilun, seems very possibly to refer to this building. He speaks of " a very remarkable sepulchral monument where the Jews and Moslems keep lamps perpetually burning," and