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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 228
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 228. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2437.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 228. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2437

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 228, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2437.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 228
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_248.jpg
Transcript 228 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Frankish name has survived ; perhaps because the town was founded by the Franks, and had no other title. Fetellus informs us that during the First Crusade, Raymond, fourth Count of Toulouse, " dit de Saint Gilles," advanced by this road, and camped at a certain casale on the night before he reached the Holy City. The distances given show that this casale—by which word William of Tyre tells us was meant an open village of one hundred houses, paying a tax of one bezant each to the seigneur—was near the Robbers' Spring, and we can have no hesitation in recognising the name of Casale Saint Gilles in the modern Sinjil, a place which, with Turmus 'Ayya (the Thormasia of the Talmud), became church property at a later period. The region between Bethel and Shechem, belonging to the tribe of Ephraim, is yet more rugged than that round Jerusalem ; the valleys are deeper, the mountains steeper and more rocky, and the character of the watershed different—broad, open vales and small plateaux, like that of Turmus 'Ayya, existing close to the central ridge. The country near Jufna is also remarkable for the extent of its cultivation, it being generally observable in Palestine that the Christian villages flourish better than those of the Moslems, partly because the Christians can claim protection from foreign powers, which the Moslems do not enjoy, being left, without any protector, to the tyranny of the Turks. But another reason for the greater prosperity of Christian districts is no doubt to be found in the helpless fatalism and indolent resignation of the Moslems, contrasted with the energy and enterprise of the villagers educated by the Greek and Latin priests. On the stony ascent near Sinjil, and in other parts of the road, the traces of the ancient Roman pavement are visible. A fence of stone was made along the sides of the highway and huge polygonal blocks of stone were carefully fitted together to form the roadway, as in the streets of Pompeii. From the narrow saddle which is now reached the first view of Gerizim is obtained, a long ridge rising to a blunt summit, with a steep eastern shoulder, not unlike that of Helvellyn seen from near Dunmail Raise. At its feet is the brown plain of the Mukhnah, and Hermon closes the view in the extreme distance; while in the foreground, at the foot of the steep stony winding descent, is the ruined inn and the beautiful spring of Khan Lubban. The mountains of Ephraim—long spurs covered on the west with thickets of mastic and dwarf pine—are drained by two main watercourses, valleys so steep as to be almost impassable by horsemen, and each indicating an ancient political boundary. The most southern of these—one of the longest valleys in the country- is formed by the junction of Wady Lubban with a more northern affluent which rises north of Sawieh, a place hereafter to be described. The great valley runs down beneath the cliff on which the Byzantine monastery called Deir-el-Kul'ah, "convent castle," is perched (see page 226), and passes through the low chalky hills to Ras-el-'Ain, the ancient Antipatris, the Crusaders' Mirabel. The northern valley, rising at the foot of Gerizim, and flowing south-west, is scarcely less formidable. The southern watercourse formed the ancient boundary between Judaea and