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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 224
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 224. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2433.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 224. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2433

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 224, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2433.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 224
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_244.jpg
Transcript 224 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Jufna, taking its name, which means "vine," from the vine cultivation surrounding it, is the ancient Gophna, the capital of one of the ten toparchies, or counties, into which Judaea was divided about the Christian era. Gophna is unnoticed in the Bible, and this instance, like that of Sepphoris or Taricheae in the north, and of Bethgubrin in the south, affords a good example of the fact that many of the important towns of Palestine, especially of the later period, are not mentioned in the sacred volume—a fact which should warn us not to be too eager in the endeavour to identify important ancient sites with Biblical towns. Gophna is mentioned in the Talmud, and by Josephus in his account of the march of Titus from Samaria on Jerusalem. It is shown on the Peutinger Tables, the Roman survey of Palestine made in the second century of our era. It contains remains of a ruined tower and a modern Latin monastery. The rains of the old Byzantine church of St. George are just outside the village. Bir-ez-Zeit, a good-sized village on the mountain to the west of Gophna, is probably the Berzetho of Josephus, the scene of the last fatal battle in which Judas Maccabaeus lost his life in the year 161 B.C. The patriot had collected a force of three thousand men at Il'asa, near Beth-horon, and advanced to intercept the communications of Bacchides, who had reached Jerusalem by the north road through Samaria. The Greek general had, however, learned caution by former misfortunes, and came back rapidly to Bireh and to Bethel, which lay within sight of the Jewish army, occupying the high ridge which is visible west of Wady- el-Jib. A furious attack on the eastern wing of the Greeks, directed no doubt against their line of retreat through the narrow pass hereafter to be mentioned, was at first successful; but the forces of Judas had dwindled by desertion during the night to only eight hundred men, and the army of Bacchides is said to have numbered twenty thousand foot and two thousand horse. The left wing closed in on the small band of patriots, and Judas was slain on the rugged mountain side after a short career of seven years of constant fighting. 'Ain Sinia, the third village in the vicinity of Wady-el-Jib, is. remarkable for the rich cultivation of fig, olive, and vine which fills the valley and climbs the hillside. In the twelfth century this village, called Val de Curs by the Franks, was given to the Canons of the Holy Sepulchre. It seems probable that the site, which is marked by numerous old rock-cut sepulchres (one having a Hebrew inscription), is that of the ancient Jeshanah, one of the three fortresses, Bethel, Jeshanah, and Ephraim, built by Abijah to guard the three main approaches by which Jeroboam might advance on Jerusalem. The ancient Roman road runs from Bethel down to Gophna, and so along the valley to 'Ain Sinia, thence climbing the slope of a hill thickly covered with olives, to join the route which runs along the watershed and descends into the narrow pass which formed the natural boundary between the tribes of Benjamin and Ephraim. The region which we leave behind is one of the principal Christian districts of Southern Palestine. Ramallah—the white village so conspicuous from the neighbourhood of Sh'afat and Bireh—contains a Latin convent: Jufna, 'Ain 'Arik, Bir-ez-Zeit, Jania, Taiyibeh (see page 222), and Deir Diwan are