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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 221
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 221. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 221. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2430

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 221, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 221
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_241.jpg
Transcript BETHEL 221 ancient religious gathering, as the golden calves, symbolic of Jehovah, were the same emblems which had been sanctioned by Aaron in the Wilderness as representing the national deity. In the later Jewish history the names Bethel, " the House of God," and Beth Aven, " the House of Nothingness," are used apparently as synonymous terms for a single site. Jewish commentators state that the two places were identical, and in the name Bethaun we see perhaps the early corruption whence the modern title Beitin was derived—a form which was in use at least as early as the fourteenth century. Barren and stony as the bleak plateau of Bethel is in appearance, it is nevertheless supplied with water from four good springs. To the east is the ruined monastery called Burj Beitin ; to the north is Deir Shabib, " the monastery of young men " mentioned in the Cartulary of the Holy Sepulchre as forming part of the property of that church. To the south are remains of a fine ancient reservoir about one hundred yards in length, while a great valley is visible running down toward Michmash, and forming probably the hiding-place where the Israelite ambush was set between Bethel and Ai. Close to the village is the ruin of a little church with a single apse, having the appearance of earlier work than that of the Crusaders, and marking the site where it was supposed that the patriarch's vision of angels must have occurred (see page 219). North of Beitin is a curious circle of stones, perhaps so arranged by a freak of nature, but having the appearance of a rude stone monument. East of the reservoir is a rock-cut tomb, probably that to which Isaac Chelo refers as the sepulchre of the prophet Ahijah; and, indeed, its position on the side of the mount is one which might not unnaturally be expected for the sepulchre of the man of God who testified against the altar in Bethel—a tomb left untouched by Josiah on the occasion of his destruction of Jeroboam's high place. In the Middle Ages considerable confusion arose respecting the site of Bethel. In the fourth century the place was known, and St. Jerome speaks of "the House of God, where naked upon the bare ground poor Jacob lay, and, placing beneath his head the stone which is described in Zechariah as having seven eyes, and is called the corner-stone by Isaiah, saw the ladder stretching even to Heaven." In the sixth century Theodoras mentions the same site, but the majority of the twelfth- century pilgrims pass it over in silence, while many of the more important accounts accept the Samaritan identification of Bethel with Mount Gerizim. Jacques de Vitray, in the thirteenth century, even supposes Jerusalem to be Bethel, and the Sakhra Rock, in the Temple enclosure, to be the stone that had formed Jacob's pillar, and which is traditionally identified with the Lia Fail, or " Stone of Destiny," brought from Ireland to Scotland, and by Edward III. from Scone to Westminster, where it now forms part of the coronation chair. It seems indeed clear that the true site of Bethel was unknown to the Crusaders, although the village was sold by Hugh of Ibelin, in the time of Baldwin V., to the Canons of the Holy Sepulchre. A short divergence from the main road eastward brings the traveller to the ruin called