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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 220
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 220. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 220. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2429

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 220, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 220
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_240.jpg
Transcript 220 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. miserable hamlet of half-ruinous stone huts, with a central high house or tower. Drystone walls enclose fields scattered with loose stones, while on the slopes the rock is grey and bare, without a single blade of green grass and almost entirely devoid of trees or shrubs. Such is the site of one of the most famous towns of Palestine, for the modern village of Beitin represents the ancient Bethel, or " House of God " (see page 217). Only one other city of Palestine, namely, Shechem, is noticed earlier in the Old Testament history than is Bethel. The second altar erected by Abraham stood between Bethel and Ai, and the same site was revisited by that patriarch on his return from Egypt. Probably the altar was still standing when Jacob fled from the south country to Harran and " lighted upon a certain place." He took of the stones of "that place " for his pillow, and called the name of " that place" Bethel ; but the name of the city near which the "place" was situate was called originally Luz. Again, the " place" called El Bethel at Luz is mentioned on the return route of Jacob to the south, and the same word "place" is used four times in this chapter in reference to Bethel. It has not apparently been generally recognised that the Hebrew word thus rendered has a special significance, being the same employed to designate the " places" of the Canaanites, or idolatrous shrines. The word in the original is Makom, identical with the Arabic Mukam or " standing place," by which a shrine or consecrated spot is now designated. The story gains force when the peculiar meaning of the term is thus brought out. Jacob came to a certain shrine—probably the altar originally erected by his grandfather Abraham—and taking the stones from it for his pillow, slept under the protection of the hallowed sanctuary, which was very probably respected by the inhabitants of the neighbouring city of Luz. Just so at the present day the stranger will find a safe retreat in the vicinity of a Moslem Mukam, placing himself under the protection of the tutelary deity. From the sanctuary the name seems, by the time at which the Book of Joshua was written, to have been transferred to the neighbouring city of Luz, and is enumerated as that of one of the towns of Benjamin. There is also in the Book of Judges an unrecognised reference to Bethel in the account of the slaughter of the Benjamites; for by " the House of God," where the ark was in those days, Josephus understands Bethel to be intended, and this interpretation is strengthened by the notice in the same chapter of the highway leading from Gibeah to the ."House of God," which from the context was evidently in the immediate vicinity of the Benjamite city. Again, in the time of Samuel we find notice of three men "going up to God to Bethel," an expression which shows that the place was a religious centre in the days of Saul. Bethel was thus apparently a venerated shrine throughout the earlier period of Hebrew history preceding the building of the Temple in Jerusalem. It was indeed—with exception of the altar near Shechem—the most ancient sanctuary in the land, and there was nothing in the re-establishment by Jeroboam of the same site as a religious centre which would have appeared a striking innovation in the eyes of the Israelites. It was a mere revival of an