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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 218
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 218. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2427.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 218. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2427

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 218, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2427.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 218
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_238.jpg
Transcript 2I8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. heap, which forms so prominent a feature on the barren plateau. Following the road which descends gradually north of Taliel-el-Ful, a fine view of the rugged ranges round Neby Samwil is obtained ; and the two ancient fallen milestones, one of which is inscribed with the names of the Antonine emperors, are passed. The road here bifurcates, one branch leading towards Gibeon and Beth-horon on the left, the other passing by the village of Er Ram, which is conspicuous for the white domed tomb-house on the hill-top (see page 214-). Er Ram is the ancient Ramah of Benjamin ; but it seems too far south to represent the more famous town of Ramah, the home and burial-place of Samuel, which was in Mount Ephraim. The flat depression now gained is the head of the great valley called Wady Beit Hanina, which has been previously described ; and the low ridge beyond it on the west conceals from view the terraced hill of Gibeon. A crumbling mound, with traces of ruins, exists beside the Beth-horon road, just beyond the valley-head, and is one of the sites generally overlooked. Its present name 'Adasa, and its position, about thirty stadia from Beth-horon, and the tradition common among the peasantry of a former conflict at the place, are indications which when taken together seem clearly to indicate that this ruin is the site of 'Adasa, where Judas Maccabaeus defeated and slew the impious Nicanor, who was advancing from Beth- horon with the avowed intention of destroying the Temple. The bare plateau thus gains interest in our eyes as the scene of one of the most gallant of the battles fought by the great Hasmonian leader. After passing Er Ram the path leads under the hill of 'Attara, the Astaroth of the mediaeval writers, and thus reaches the village of Bireh, the ancient Beeroth of Benjamin, a rambling stone hamlet with a fine spring, and ruins of a beautiful Gothic church and of an ancient khan (see pages 215 and 216). Pausing by the spring which runs out beneath the walls of a little building which forms the village guest-house, we may glance at the history of the village and its church. Beeroth of Benjamin is not a site conspicuous in Jewish history, though probably identical with the Berea where Bacchides collected his forces before the fatal battle of Berzetho, in which Judas Maccabaeus was slain. The church, which was built by the Franks in the first half of the twelfth century, was consecrated to St Mary, and the town, which boasted of Frankish burghers, was given by Baldwin IV. to the Canons of the Holy Sepulchre, with Mezr'ah—not far north—in exchange for Kefr Malik and 'Ain Kinia, villages in the same district. The place was sometimes called Magina by the Franks, and sometimes Grand Mahomery, in contradistinction to Little Mahomery, or Beit Surik. A tradition mentioned by Maundrell makes Bireh to be the place where, after going a day's journey with their company, Joseph and Mary found that the child Jesus had tarried behind in Jerusalem. The story is not, however, mentioned in the Byzantine accounts of the country, nor even in the Crusading descriptions before the fifteenth century. The apses and side walls, with beautiful carved capitals of various designs once supporting