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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 212
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 212. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2421.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 212. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2421

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 212, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2421.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 212
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_232.jpg
Transcript 2i2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. heather of Palestine—makes a marked contrast between the eastern and western slopes of the King's Mountain. The grey plain of Jericho and the black snake-like line of the Jordan jungle are dimly seen through the hot haze which generally hangs over the valley. The noble ranges of Nebo and Mount Gilead close the view on the east, and the blue-grey mountain of bare rock now called Tell 'Asur—probably the ancient Baal Hazor—forms the sky-line on the north. The little dust-coloured villages perched on the slopes and crowning the ridges are nearly all famous in Jewish history. Nearest to the spectator is Hozmeh, the ancient Azmaveth, standing on a hill-top above the curious rude stone monuments called " Graves of the Amalekites"—or "of the Sons of Israel." Farther away is Jeba, the ancient Geba of Benjamin, where Jonathan smote the Philistine garrison, and where the Benjamites were almost exterminated. Michmash, on the opposite side of the great passage, lies low, and is hidden by higher ground ; and Parah of Benjamin is recognisable in the ruins above the beautiful pool of 'Ain Farah, in the gorge east of Jeba. Still farther away lie Bethel, Ai, Rimmon, Ephron, and other sites of minor interest. On a lower spur between Anathoth and Azmaveth is a ruin with ancient wells marking the site now called 'Alnut, and in the book of Ezra, Almon or Alemeth. This place has an interest not generally recognised, for, according to the Targums, Almon was identical with the long-sought Bahurim, famous in the history of David. Of the position of Bahurim we have but little indication in Scripture. It was on David's route from Jerusalem to the Jordan Valley, and apparently in the territory of Benjamin, and certainly beyond the brow of the range of Olivet. It appears that the road ran beneath the hillside near Bahurim, for Shimei " went along on the hillside," casting stones on the patient monarch, who accepted his curses and his penitence with equal dignity. All these requisites are found at 'Alnut. The ancient highway to Jericho descends by the spur on which the city stood, after passing the brow of the hill near Anathoth ; the ruin lies well within the limits of the territory of Benjamin, and Jewish tradition identifies the site by the later name which the place still retains. It was then, perhaps, in one of those ancient wells still existing in the ruins that Jonathan and Ahimaaz lay hidden beneath the parched corn spread in the sun in the court of a man's house in Bahurim. The thirty miles of road between Jerusalem and Shechem are probably better known to the majority of travellers than any other portion of the country ; with exception, perhaps, of the high-road between Jaffa and the Holy City. Yet there are many points of interest along this northern route which are unnoticed in even the latest o-uide-book, but are not the less worthy of attention from all who are interested in the antiquities of Palestine. Some of the most interesting of these unnoticed sites may therefore be briefly described in the succeeding pages. Passing beneath the arch of the " Pillar Gate," as the Damascus Gate is called by the Moslems—which, with its crenellated parapet and flanking towers, is the most picturesque entrance to the city—the traveller sets out along a stony lane between drystone walls and