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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 208
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 208. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 208. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2417

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 208, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 208
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_228.jpg
Transcript 208 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. apparently in its present position, by John Poloner. In the fourteenth century Marino Sanuto identifies Philip's Fountain with En Hakkore, or the Fountain of the Jaw Bone, famous in the history of Samson, and which was at that period supposed to have been near Beit Jibrin, at the edge of the Philistine plain. In earlier times the fountain where Philip baptized the eunuch was shown opposite the ruin of Bethsura, on the road from Jerusalem to Hebron. The Bordeaux pilgrim mentions a chapel on this spot, the ruins of which still remain close to the fine spring called 'Ain Dhirweh, under a low cliff above which the village of Halhul stands on the hill-top. Wady-el-Werd obtains its name from the cultivation of roses in the valley. The rose is rarely seen in Palestine, but appears to thrive well in this place, and is used for the preparation of the attar of roses. According to the Babylonian Talmud a single rose garden existed in Jerusalem, dating back to the time of " the first prophets," that is to say, to the period preceding the Captivity. The rose will not, however, grow wild in so hot a climate as that of southern Palestine, although the dog-rose is found on Lebanon and on the heights of Hermon. The best authorities are agreed that the " Rose of Sharon " mentioned in the Song of Songs is the white narcissus which grows in such profusion in the maritime plain. The Targums translate the original Hebrew in this sense, and the modern Arabic name of the narcissus {buseil) is radically identical with the Hebrew habutzeleth, rendered "rose" in our version. If instead of crossing by 'Ain Karim to 'Ain Haniyeh the traveller follows the main road from Kolonia to the capital, he will find scenery fully as picturesque and interesting as that already described. Ascending by a steep zigzag he reaches the edge of the Jerusalem plateau, and will turn to cast a look on the road just past, soon hidden by the brow of the watershed ridge. Beneath him lie the dark gardens of Kolonia, and directly opposite rises the ridge on which Kastal stands, on a high knoll shutting out the view of the maritime plain. The olive-yards of 'Ain Karim are visible on the left, with bare ridges rising in broad steps like those of an amphitheatre, and due to the regular stratification of the limestone. On the right the same valley is seen winding down from the chalky plateau where stands the curious conical mound called Taliel-el-Ful, and the ridges beyond are equally rocky and barren in appearance (see pages 188 and 213). The view is here bounded by the hill-crest on which the tall minaret of Neby Samwil stands out against the sky, and on the south side of the valley the village of Lifta is visible, perched on the edge of a precipitous descent. This village has been identified by some authors with the " Fountain of the Water of Nephtoah," which lay on the border of Judah ; but it is far more probably the ancient Eleph, a city of Benjamin. As the traveller recalls the scenes of this mountain district, he will see in imagination the tall Philistines in their mail coats and bronze helmets flying before the despised herdsmen of Judah, armed only with goads or mattocks. He will recall the handful of ill-disciplined zealots driving back the trained soldiers of Antioch from the hill of Beth-horon. He will see in his