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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 206
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 206. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 206. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2415

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 206, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 206
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_226.jpg
Transcript 2o6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the black cypresses of the convent garden. The population of the village is now about six hundred souls, including one hundred Latin Christians. There are also a few nuns of the order of the Sisters of Zion, who assist the Franciscan monks by the education of the native girls (see page 205). As early as the twelfth century the site of 'Ain Karim was fixed by tradition as that of the summer residence of Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, and was regarded as the place of St. John's birth and the "city of Judah" where the Salutation occurred. It was called Locus Silvestris and Domus Zachariae, and in the fifteenth century John Poloner found there a church in two stories—probably that is with a vault, the upper church having been destroyed by the Saracens. He mentions a cleft in the rock where the ground opened to conceal the infant Baptist during the persecution of Herod at the time of the Bethlehem massacre, and a fountain beside the road where the Virgin rested on the occasion of her visit to Elisabeth. The former tradition now attaches to a chapel built in i860, and supposed to mark the site of the house of Zacharias (see page 207). The spring near the village is still called the " Fountain of our Lady Mary." These traditions are not traceable further back than Crusading times. They belong to that extraordinary system of minute localisation of sacred spots which spread over Palestine under the Latin kings. The number of sacred places in Jerusalem was increased three or four fold after the Crusading conquest, churches and chapels were built all over the land, and each claimed to enclose some sacred spot or to contain some precious relic. The Crusaders were ignorant in many cases of the ancient traditions of the Church preserved in the itineraries and pilgrim journals of the fourth, fifth, and sixth centuries ; and the ecclesiastical authorities who determined the sacred sites shown to the devout warriors of the twelfth century can have bestowed but little care on the study of scriptural topography. With the exception of the most important sacred sites, it is rare to find the Crusaders' church standing anywhere near the Byzantine chapel which claimed to occupy the same sacred site. The Byzantine traditions seem sometimes to have been derived from Jewish sources, and are in such cases very valuable ; but the Crusading traditions were more remarkable for their startling originality than for their reliability. But the process of multiplication of sacred sites did not cease in the twelfth century; their numbers grew steadily, and many new ones were added in the fifteenth and even later. Within the last ten years new discoveries in sacred topography have been made in Nazareth and at other places, and every chapel in the country pretends to possess some unique claim to veneration. At 'Ain Karim the twelfth-century traditions were supplemented by others in the fourteenth century, and the rock-cut cell of St. John, now called El Habs, is a site apparently not dating earlier than the fifteenth century. The fertile valley of Beit Hanina, between 'Ain Karim and the ridge of Soba, is now known as the " Wilderness of St. John," and supposed to be the desert to which the Baptist retired; which modern scholars, however, identify with the dreary waste west of the Dead Sea.