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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 201
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 201. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 201. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2410

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 201, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 201
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_221.jpg
Transcript KOLONIA. 201 splendid church was built in the flat dell north-east of the village, and a convent was founded not far off beside a stream of clear water running over the rocky bed of a ravine. The church is still standing, and is one of the most perfect buildings of its period left in the Holy Land. The dim shadows of the frescoes which once adorned its walls are still traceable, though the colours and outlines are obliterated by age. The west window is remarkable for the intricacy of its mouldings, and the vaults below contain a fresh spring reached by steps, and to which no doubt some tradition now lost was formerly attached. The names of the early pilgrims are still visible scratched on the stucco of the internal walls. Kuryet-el-'Anab, as before noticed, is one of the claimants for the name Emmaus, though its only pretension is its distance from Jerusalem; but perhaps the most satisfactory suggestion which has been made, as to the Hebrew name of this village, is that it is the ancient Kirjath of Benjamin. Leaving the open valley with its green vineyards, above which the white houses of the village rise west of the church and its solitary palm, the road to Jerusalem ascends by a zigzag to another long ridge, from which the picturesque village of Soba becomes visible on the right, separated from the road by an extremely deep and almost impassable gorge. Soba is one of the most picturesquely situated places in Palestine. The village crowns a conical knoll rising from a dark ridge clothed in thick copse of mastic and oak, and the topmost tower forms a conspicuous landmark from all sides. The modern name is exactly descriptive of the site, the word " sobah " indicating one of the conical heaps of grain which may be seen in the centre of a Syrian threshing-floor in August. The site is so conspicuous that almost every writer has offered his conjecture as to the identity of the place with some ancient town, and Soba has been supposed at various periods to represent Kirjath Jearim, Zuph, Ramathaim Zophim, and even Modin. There can be no doubt that Soba is an ancient place. Rock-cut tombs of the most ancient form used by the Jews are to be found among the vineyards south of the village, and rock-cut wine-presses exist near them. In the twelfth century the place was called Belmont by the Franks, and the traces of a Crusading fortress are still visible on the hill. Its claim to represent Modin is more ancient than that of Latron, although equally unsatisfactory. In the fourteenth century the Jewish pilgrims were quite at a loss to decide between the rival sites, and Isaac Chelo even suggests that Ramleh may have been Modin ; but in the fourth century the true site of the home of the Maccabees, the present village of El Medyeh, seems still to have been recognised on the low hills east of Lydda. Following the ridge north of Soba, the traveller arrives at the descent which leads across the Wady Beit Hanina, and sees before him the bleak grey range capped with white chalk which hides the Holy City from view. Beneath him is the small village of Kolonia, with its white shrine perched on the slope above the gardens of orange and pomegranate which surround a little hostelry beside a bridge of several arches spanning the shingly bed of the torrent (see page 202). The descent to Kolonia is more than a thousand feet, and an equally steep ascent leads up on the east to the barren plateau of the watershed on which Jerusalem stands. As the eye travels round southward, following the course of the great valley, 27