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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 200
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 200. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2408.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 200. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2408

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 200, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2408.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 200
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_219.jpg
Transcript 200 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. at the required distance of about sixty stadia north-west from Jerusalem. There is, however, no circumstance beyond the modern tradition which tends to confirm the identity of Kubeibeh with the scriptural Emmaus. Hidden from the sight of the traveller, in a deep valley among shady gardens of orange and lemon surrounding a group of beautiful springs, lies a little ruined site which may perhaps be considered to possess more claim to the honour of representing the scene of the first appearance of Christ after the Resurrection morning. The ancient Roman road from Jerusalem to Gath and Ashdod descends straight to the Valley of Elah, and runs along a plateau from which we look down on this secluded valley. Leaving the road, the explorer passes by ancient rock-cut sepulchres and by the village of Wad Fiikin—probably the Pekiin of the Talmudic writers. Immediately opposite are the remains of a little chapel near a clear spring welling out beneath a low cliff, and here are ruins of an ancient site called Khamasa—a name which at once recalls the Hebrew Hammath and the late Emmaus. The distance of the ruin from Jerusalem is a little over sixty furlongs, and the beauty and fertility of the valley seem to render it a probable site for the little Roman colony established by Vespasian. The out-of-the-way situation of the place has probably caused the identification to escape notice, but the neighbourhood appears to have been once an important Christian centre, and the ruins of three other mediaeval churches lie within a radius of three or four miles from Khamasa. Leaving the neighbourhood of Emmaus Nicopolis and Latron, the traveller advances into the mountains through the Pass of Bab-el-Wad, the " Gate of the Valley." Passing by the shady group of terebinths which surround the little shrine of Imam 'Aly, who gives his name to the valley, the road climbs up between rough dark hills of limestone rising in natural steps formed by the regular stratification of the rock, and reaches the ridge on which stands the flourishing stone village called Kuryet-el-'Anab, better known as Abu Ghosh, the name of a celebrated family of bandit chiefs once the terror of the neighbourhood, but now reduced to insignificance (see page 199). Abu Ghosh is another of the places which has offered an irresistible temptation to the antiquary anxious to recover its scriptural name. In the fourth century it was regarded as the site of Kirjath Jearim, the " City of Forests," where the Ark found refuge for nearly half a century, and the identification has in modern times been supported by the authority of the famous Dr. Robinson. Nevertheless there are weighty objections to the view, for Kirjath Jearim was close to Bethshemesh, as Josephus tells us, and the whole line of the border of Judah is thrown into confusion by fixing the site at Abu Ghosh, while the "forests" which gave their name to the ancient city have no counterpart at Kuryet-el-'Anab, although east of Bethshemesh the thickets are still wild and tangled, covering the steep ridges with luxuriant natural growth. The Crusading topographers, with the recklessness and disregard both of older tradition and of probability which seem generally to characterize their fanciful distribution of ancient sites, arrived at the conclusion that Kuryet-el-'Anab was the ancient Anathoth, the home of the prophet Jeremiah. A