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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 197
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 197. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 197. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2405

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 197, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 197
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_216.jpg
Transcript VALLEY OF AJALON. i97 'Ur-el-F6ka (the Upper Beth-horon) and Beit 'Ur-et-Tahta (the Lower Beth-horon), situated less than a' mile apart, and the one some five hundred feet above the other (see pages 192 and 193). Upper Beth-horon, a ruinous-looking hamlet with a great ruined reservoir, stands at the extremity of a narrow space of hard grey limestone, and is surrounded by a straggling olive grove. The ancient road, descending the hill by rock-cut steps through a narrow cutting, appears to be the work of the Romans, and leads from the plain near Lydda to the watershed east of Gibeon, being skilfully engineered along the crest of the long spur leading by the Beth-horon Pass. The view from the village extends on the south-west across the open Vale of Ajalon to Gezer and the Philistine plain, while on the north the rugged range of Mount Ephraim is seen crowned with fortress villages. Beth-horon (" the House of Caverns") first appears in history as the site of the great battle when Joshua defeated the league of Hivite chiefs gathered to the assistance of the Gibeonites, and as the scene of the miracle when the " Sun stood still and the Moon stayed," until Israel was avenged of its enemies. The site has never been lost. It was known to the early fathers of the Church and to the Crusading pilgrims as well as it is to ourselves, and the village of Beth-horon is one of the few undisputed identifications in Palestine topography. Solomon fortified it as a frontier town; Shishak enumerates it in the list of the cities which he wrested from Rehoboam ; Judas Maccabaeus twice saved the city and the Temple by victories over the Greek forces in the neighbourhood of this steep ascent. In the year 168 B.C. the patriotic son of Mattathias gathered a handful of zealous outlaws on the summit of the stony ridge and fell suddenly on the army of Seron, the Greek general, who was marching from Lydda on Jerusalem, and the victory which followed was the first blow struck for freedom by the national party. In the year 162 b.c. another Greek army attempted to advance by this route, supported by the sally of the garrison under Nicanor from Jerusalem, but the battle of Adasa was followed by a pursuit which drove the foreigners down the same steep slope which had witnessed the flight of the Amorites before Joshua, and that of the Philistines from Michmash before Saul and Jonathan. The little ruin called Il'asa, close to the Lower Beth-horon, also probably represents the site of Eleasa, where Judas arrayed his army before the fatal battle of Berzetho, in which he lost his life. The Vale of Ajalon, named from the " village of deer " (Ajalon), now called Yalo, which stands on a low hill to the south, is a broad corn valley below the mountains forming the mouth of the long narrow ravine which bounds the ridge of Beth-horon on the south, and which is now called Wady Suleiman (see page 195). Viewed from the neighbourhood of the village of Latron, three famous sites are seen grouped on the low hills south-east of this corn valley, namely, Ajalon itself; 'Amwas, the Emmaus of the Book of Maccabees; and Beit Nuba, where King Richard fixed his camp when contemplating an advance on the Holy City, and which the early pilgrims erroneously supposed to represent the site of Nob, the city of the priests.