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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 194
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 194. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 194. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2402

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 194, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 194
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_213.jpg
Transcript I94 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. summits of the chain. The ridge is a steep anticlinal—a great arch of hard rocks curving down east and west to valley and plain. The lower hills on the west belong to a distinct formation, and are indeed remains of the great chalk sea which once overflowed the hard limestone mountains. Hence it arises that the division between the higher mountains and the lower hills of the Judaean chain is so distinct; and the traveller looking down from the higher spurs sees the low hills gleaming with white chalk or dusky with long olive groves, forming an intermediate district between the grey mountains and the rich brown plains. In Scripture and in later Jewish writings the two regions receive distinct names, the low hills being called " Shephelah," and the higher range the " King's Mountain " in the Talmud. Three main passes lead from the maritime plain to the Kings Mountain or Chain of Judaea: one from the north-west, one from the west, and a third from the south-west. The first of these is the famous Pass of Beth-horon, the scene of so many Jewish victories ; the second is the road by which the modern traveller approaches the Holy City, leading up from Ramleh and past the " Gate of the Valley," through Wady 'Aly, a.gorge flanked by rugged mountains covered with mastic bushes and crowned by a belt of firs and other forest trees. The third pass leads through the broad corn vale of Elah and ascends to the neighbourhood of Halhul, half-way between Jerusalem and Hebron. At the time of the great struggle for national existence Judas Maccabaeus successfully resisted three Greek armies attempting to ascend by each of these three main approaches successively. The liberation of Judaea was the immediate result of the three victorious " Battles of the Passes " at Beth-horon, Emmaus, and Bethsura. The three great valleys thus noticed—the main drains of the mountain system—are fed by innumerable torrent-beds, which form an intricate network of deep and narrow trenches, increasing in size as they recede farther from the watershed and plunge deeper towards the plain. Long and narrow spurs run out between these ravines, and a traveller who attempts to ride north and south instead of following the direction of the country will find his day wasted in tedious climbing and break-neck scrambles, and may consider himself fortunate if he makes a mile of way in an hour. The western spurs of the King's Mountain present a far less bare and sun-scorched appearance than do the steep eastern spurs above the Jordan Valley. The mountains are full of springs of clear cool water gushing out between the slabs of shining limestone; and although the valleys and ravines never run water, except perhaps for a few hours in winter when filled by a sudden spate or thunderstorm, still there is no lack of " fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills." In the Shephelah, on the other hand, the water sinks through the porous chalk and finds its way beneath the surface, springing up again in great blue pools at the eastern border of the maritime plain. The inhabitants obtain water from wells and cisterns in the Shephelah, but almost every village has its spring in the King's Mountain. The mountain spurs thus watered and exposed to the cool western sea-breeze, which in summer blows steadily throughout the day, are thickly covered with wild growth which has