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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 187
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 187. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 187. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2394

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 187, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 187
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_205.jpg
Transcript ^mm BETHEL. ^7 mourning their lost one, are but a sample of the herbage which covers all this neglected land when the first spring has passed. " Upon the land of my people shall come up thorns and briers." In fact, prickle, brier, quickthorn, and nettle are all combined in their formidable stems, whose only use is as fuel, and which are laboriously gathered by the women to heat their ovens. " As the crackling of thorns under a pot" is a simile which often recurs to the traveller as he watches his barley cake tossed on the quickly blazing thistles and then buried in their embers. And as the thorn has taken the place of the vine, so has the solitary stork on Jeba's crumbling tower supplanted the watchful sentinel of Israel's army. But beneath that cliff the ravine is still pierced with caves, and one large cavern just under the fort is surely the very cave out which rushed the liers-in-wait of the Israelitish army, who fell with such fearful slaughter on the hapless Benjamites in that dark epoch when the tribe was all but annihilated (Judges xx.). From Geba and Michmash we turn four or five miles northward in search of a site yet more ancient and full of Patriarchal reflections, Bethel. But before reaching it we must find out Ai. We know it was to the east of Bethel, that there was a hill between them from which the plains of Jordan could be seen, and that it was the second city utterly destroyed by Joshua. We gather from the account of its capture by Joshua that there was a valley to the north of the town and low ground to the west, where an ambush could be set unseen from the city, while on .the opposite side was a plain. The area, then, in which we must search is very limited. Colonel Wilson was, we believe, the first to point out the exact spot, in a knoll which bears the name of Et Tell, "the heap" (see page 185). The modern name is a remarkable incidental confirmation of sacred history. " Joshua burnt Ai, and made it an heap \telT\ for ever, even a desolation unto this day." Now the place has no other name than " Et Tell," and it is to be noted that the word " tell " occurs only three or four times in the Hebrew Bible, while it is one of the most familiar words in Arabic, every place on a rising ground having this prefix. But nowhere else do we ever find it standing alone—the heap, the one made and cursed by the captains of Israel. We can follow all the military evolutions of Joshua. The ambush, following the ancient causeway, still to be traced, from Jordan to Bethel as far as Michmash, would ascend the valley west of Ai, and arrive within a quarter of a mile without coming in sight of it, and lie in wait unsuspected. The main body, keeping the road, would appear before the town on the open, east and south. From the knoll the figure of Joshua would be plainly visible to either party, with his spear stretched out towards the city. Lieut. Conder in his examination of the Tell has remarked, what had escaped former observers, that the debris which forms the mound is composed of masonry broken small, unlike other ruins—in fact, that it had been literally ground to powder. Hither Abraham had returned with Lot to the same " place where his tent had been at the beginning, between Bethel and Hai, unto the place at the altar which he had made there at the first." This altar would naturally be on the hill, not in the plain below. From its top Lot lifted up his eyes and beheld alL the plains of Jordan. This is the most westerly spot