Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 184
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 184. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 184. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 184, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 184
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_202.jpg
Transcript l84 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Mukmas, stands on the north side of a ravine, the Wady Suweinit, or Valley of the Thorn- tree, which takes its rise west of Ai, and soon becomes a narrow gorge with vertical sides eight hundred feet deep—a fissure across the country only detected when arrived on its actual brink. It is the true head of the Wady Kelt. There can be no doubt as to the identity of the present Jeba and Mukmas with the position of the respective garrisons of the Philistines and Israelites. We read there was a sharp rock on the one side and a sharp rock on the other side; the name of the one was Bozez, i.e. " shining," and the other Seneh, " the acacia" (i Sam. xiv. 4). Josephus enters into more minute detail. Michmash, he says, was a precipice with three tops, ending in a long sharp tongue and protected by surrounding cliffs. Exactly such a natural fortress exists ending in a narrow tongue to the east, with cliffs below and an open valley behind it, and a saddle towards the west on which the village stands. Facing it on the south is an equally precipitous cliff, apparently as inaccessible from the ravine as the other, and still bearing the name of Seneh, from the acacia-trees which here and there are found in the nooks. Now the valley runs due east, and the southern cliff is consequently always in shade. As we have noted in going from Jerusalem to Jericho, there is a marked contrast in colour always between the slopes that face the north and the south, and here it is especially striking. The sun-dried chalk face of the northern side gleams brightly in the sunlight from the south, and has well earned its name of Bozez, or the " shining." To climb down from Geba must have been difficult enough, but the ascent on the other side, which Jonathan and his armour-bearer achieved " upon their hands and feet," would try an experienced mountaineer, and their apparition up such a cliff may explain the panic of the Philistines, as they would be taken for the advance guard of a numerous storming party. Across the narrow chasm the adventure could be easily watched, and the noise in the alarmed camp be heard. Saul's garrison would cross the valley higher up with ease by the path to the village behind, and thence naturally the pursuit was towards Bethel and down the Valley of Ajalon towards Ain Duk, already the scene of the first great victory of Joshua. It is evident from the history compared with the topography that the Philistines had not secured any posts on the south of the ravine, but had spread their plundering parties east to Zeboim (Duk), west to Beth-horon, and north towards Ophrah. On their panic the northern Israelites who had hid themselves in Ephraim, and also the numerous deserters in their camp, turned against them and pursued them down to the central valley. With the identification of Michmash that of Geba is necessarily secured. There are few events of a circumstantial history three thousand years old more minutely identified in their every detail than this surprise of the garrison of Michmash. We see where Saul lay at bay. On the south side of the chasm stands Geba of Benjamin, on a rocky knoll, with cisterns beneath and corn-land to the eastward, still known as Jeba. There has been much confusion between this Geba and Gibeah of Saul, usually identified with the modern Taleil-el- Ful; but the suggestion of Lieut. Conder that Gibeah of Saul applied to a district as well as a place seems to solve the difficulty. Once again in Old Testament history, after the