Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 182
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 182. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 182. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 182, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 182
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_200.jpg
Transcript l82 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. a centralizing authority. Any traveller who wishes to explore or to ramble at his leisure will do well to make his own terms in a friendly way with the resident tribes. We have already rambled over the Jordan plain. We shall now, turning straight from the foot of the pass of the Kelt, proceed an hour's ride northwards to Ain Duk, the great spring which divides with the Prophet's Fountain the honour of giving life and fertility to the great oasis. We cast a passing glance at Abou-el-'Aleik, two ruined forts which once held the entrance of the pass, the Thrax and Taurus, which were destroyed by Pompey, and below them a small Saracenic ruin (Kakon), marking, perhaps, the site of the Castle of Cyprus, built by Herod to command Jericho, with the rocks steeply scarped in front of it, and we follow up by the side of ruined aqueducts past the mouth of Wady Harith and the cell-pierced front of Quarantania, and past the extensive works generally looked upon as ruined Crusading sugar- mills, till we reach the mighty fountain of Ain Duk. The plenteous supply is evidently due to its situation at the foot of Quarantania to the north-east, where various wadys concentrate, and the underground drainage provides a perennial and inexhaustible supply. Two copious springs and several smaller ones burst close together from the southern part of the Wady Nuweimeh. The largest spring is overhung by the boughs of a dom-tree, the largest existing tree on the plain. Only its overflow is allowed to go down the natural channel; the bulk of the supply is interrupted by the ancient aqueduct up the course of which we have been riding, and with the velocity of a mill-race is carried close above Ain-es-Sultan, watering the fields and plots on its way by little sluices, and still turning the wheel of a disused mill. Though no doubt mills were used for the manufacture of sugar, most of the so-called sugar-works are simply old corn-mills, erected by a people who looked upon water-power as more economical than the ceaseless toil of wives and slave-girls at the hand-mill. Not only is this fountain important as the greatest source of the fertility of the Jordan plain, it is also at the spot where three roads—and these the principal lines of communication from the centre of the country—converge ; yet, unlike its rival, the Prophet's Fountain, it has barely a history and scarcely a ruin. The only historical incident connected with its name is that at the small fort which guarded it Simon Maccabaeus and his two sons were treacherously murdered by his son-in-law Ptolemy. The Book of the Maccabees calls it "a little hold," and not more than such do the remains indicate. Two rock-hewn tombs above may not improbably be those of the Maccabaean family, buried where Hyrcanus endeavoured to avenge their murder. Behind the ravines which open on the plain of Jordan at this point, and which run almost concentrically towards Jericho, lies that hill-country which was the very centre and heart of Israel, the hill-country of little Benjamin. No area in the whole land is more thickly studded with historical reminiscences. Its bare hills and rounded hollows, its deep glens and rugged passes, were the theatre of events which occupy the Bible narrative from Abraham to the Captivity. Here camped Abraham and Lot; here slept and dreamt Jacob ; here were the first battles of the conqueror Joshua ; here the struggles and the dark tragedies of the period of the Judges, the home of the great prophet Samuel, and the birthplace of the first king, • -ill