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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 180
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 180. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 180. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2387

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 180, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 180
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_198.jpg
Transcript '*•»« l8o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. one of the overhanging peaks. But " The Raven's Crag" is a name naturally suggested for any cliff where the raven has taken up its permanent quarters. This gorge is the home of the raven as Quarantania is of the griffon vulture. But the raven is universally spread over the whole country wherever there are cliffs or ravines, and ravens' crags are not peculiar to the Kelt. However admirably suited for a hiding-place, it is difficult to see how Elijah should have fled to a place so out of the natural order of the narrative. It was a place opposite Jordan, and the other claimant, the Wady Yabis, on the other side, facing Bethshean, and in Elijah's native district, seems a more probable locality. But one other scriptural incident is undoubtedly connected with the Kelt. It is the valley of Achor in which Achan was stoned—not, of course, in the gorge or upper ravine, but on the open plain, where the brook runs south of Er Riha, past Jiljulieh, to the Jordan (see page 177). It would be in view of the Israelitish camp, and the valley is full of pebbles and boulders of every size, which would account for its being chosen as the place of execution, since there is hardly a stone to be found in the surrounding plain beyond the limits of this torrent bed. Though the road by the south brink of the Kelt is by no means the most picturesque or interesting of the passes from the upper country to the Jordan Valley, yet it has been for over two thousand years almost the only route commonly used to reach the plains. It is only a short day's ride, but the descent is most rapid and continuous. It is but thirteen miles in a straight line to Jericho, yet the fall is three thousand six hundred and twenty feet, and four hundred feet more to the Dead Sea. The road is said to be still as dangerous as when it supplied our Lord with the scene for the parable of the Good Samaritan, and no doubt the wild ravines and gorges, labyrinthic in their plans and honeycombed with caverns, afford cover for freebooters which could nowhere be surpassed. But though to a Bedouin the temptation to pillage is generally irresistible, he is amenable to the laws for the regulation of robbery to which he has been an assenting party. Thus the traveller who has engaged a guard (and it need be only a nominal one, so long as the regulation fee has been paid) from the recognised authority—which is not the Turkish Government, but the Sheikh of Abou Dis, near Bethany, the representative of the Ghwarneh tribe—may roam in perfect safety so long as he abides within the limits of his jurisdiction, and no one will molest him. But should he, e.g., incautiously cross the wady, which happens to be a frontier line, and be suddenly pounced upon and sent back in the costume of his birth, he has only himself to blame for his loss. The writer, when once he had placed himself under the protection of the tribes, and was spending several weeks in the Jordan Valley, was in the habit of frequently riding alone to and from Jerusalem, but, being known by sight or report to the robbers, though often reconnoitred, was never once molested, either by night or day. Recently the Turkish Government has undertaken the safe conduct of all travellers on this road, a proceeding not unnaturally resented by the Bedouin, as being an infringement of local self-eovernment on the part of