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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 179
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 179. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2386.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 179. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2386

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 179, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2386.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 179
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_197.jpg
Transcript THE WADY KELT. 1?g ♦ which could scarcely have been the case had they been traditionally connected with the monasteries of the Jordan plain. But let^us now pass round the shoulder of Mount Quarantania to the entrance of the Wady Harith, down which Abraham and Lot descended to the fair plain of the Jordan, and in the gorges of which Joshua placed his ambuscade for his assault of Ai. Here, facing south, we find even more anchorite dwellings than on the eastward bluff, and provided with water by a like system, though here drawn directly from the aqueduct which collected and economized the supply of the upper part of the valley. Passing about a mile farther south we reach the opening of the Wady Kelt, by the edge of which, on the south, runs the road from Jerusalem, and which was the tribal boundary between Judah and Benjamin. No language can adequately describe the rugged wildness of this glen. It is the only one west of Jordan which in its depth and seclusion and its perennial verdure rivals the gorges of the Arnon and Callirrhoe on the opposite side Jordan. In many parts it is simply a fissure with a perennial stream at the bottom, to which the sun can never penetrate save for a few minutes, and which is shaded by a thick row of luxuriant oleanders. Its sides are unscalable save by the ibex and the coney, which are both found here, secure from the attacks of the hunter. This dell is their northernmost limit in Palestine. Yet this glen, like the face of Quarantania, was seized on and occupied by the anchorites. The Deir Wady Kelt, as it is now called, was one of the seven monasteries of the Jericho circle dedicated to St. John of Choseboth, and it has evidently been inhabited down to a much later period than the caves we have been describing. The old Greek frescoes have frequently been covered over with fresh paintings having Arabic writing. There is still an inscription in Greek and Arabic, or Coptic, over the doorway, but it gives no date, merely stating that the monastery was restored by one Abraham and his brothers, of the Christian village of Jufna. We may at least infer that it has been inhabited by monks since the Saracenic conquest. Wilder still, if possible, than the situation of the monastery of Wady Kelt is that of Deir-el-Mukellik, in a ravine a little farther south, not far from the road to Nebi Musa, the great point of Moslem pilgrimages just south of the road from Jerusalem. Its remains are insignificant, but there are many rock-hewn cells, and a visit to it gives a yet clearer conception of the vast amount of zeal, devotion, and energy that once peopled with a multitude of self-sacrificing devotees this now desolate wilderness. But the remains in the Wady Kelt .are not confined to monastery and hermits' cells alone. On the extreme edge of the hills to the north are the remains of a Crusading fortress, and all down the ravine on both sides are noble aqueducts, in some parts remaining, at three different levels, and sometimes spanning the valley. One of the aqueducts on the north side was for the purpose of supplying the anchorites and monastery, and leads to an immense vaulted cistern in three compartments. The other aqueducts, far more ancient, were those by which Herod supplied his newly built Jericho. The Wady Kelt is popularly supposed to be the brook Cherith (see page 169), where Elijah was fed by ravens, and many ingenious arguments have been adduced in support of the theory. One is that the name 'Oreb, or raven, still clings to