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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 178
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 178. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 178. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2385

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 178, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 178
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_196.jpg
Transcript ,78 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. ♦ hole in the roof, and we have found even three consecutive stories one above the other. Generally there is a chapel in the centre of each group, and hermits' cells running on either side of it. Frequently there is an inner dark chamber behind the cells. In these we found many skeletons lying east and west in undisturbed order, awaiting the resnrrection, desiccated rather than decayed. Each anchorite thus dwelt almost in his grave, and many generations seemed to have succeeded each other. Higher up again are a third, and above these a fourth series of aerial human dwellings, some of them now, by the wearing away of the paths, quite inaccessible. One of the upper series can still with some difficulty be reached. In it we found beneath a slab in the flooring a dark dungeon, which had also been a burial vault, and was full of bones. The front of the inhabited chamber was vaulted with good masonry, and had an arched doorway into an adjacent chapel. The apse of the chapel was hewn out of the rock facing eastward, with a fresco of the Virgin in the concave, and a small pointed window below. On each side of the apse was a little arched niche, piscina or credence table. The walls of all the chapels and of many of the cells are covered with fresco figures of saints, the colours being still bright and fresh. We observed that all the lower stories in the mountains have been visited by iconoclast Moslems, for all the faces of the figures are mutilated and almost obliterated, while those in the upper stories have escaped. In all the chapels the figure of the angel Gabriel occupies the right side at the east end, and generally the figure of our Lord the centre. Nowhere is the Virgin and Child represented. St. Paul, St. Andrew, Gregory, Basil, Chrysostom occur, especially Athanasius, " the holy Athanasius, the witness for the truth " (?0 aytos AOavaaios r^ a\rj6eia<> fxaprvs) being the legend. The mode in which the hermits were supplied with water was very ingenious. From the top of the mountain above and from the slopes below the crest, small carefully cemented channels are constructed in the face of the cliff, which collected and conveyed supplies of rain water to cisterns constructed inside the cells. The whole construction of this city of ascetic habitations, and especially the style and subjects of the frescoes, point to a period which is isolated from either the Roman, Crusading, or modern history of the land. When we observe the type of the frescoes, and the prominence given to the great fathers in the Arian controversy, all contemporaries at the beginning of the fourth century, and all owing their favour to the part they took in that controversy, may we not ascribe the date of these excavations to the period when that fierce struggle was at its height, and probably, too, to the hands of those who fled for safety and seclusion from the Arian persecution to these solitudes ? It is remarkable, also, that we could not find any portraiture of St. Jerome among the frescoes. This leads to the conjecture that they were executed before his canonization. At least it is strange that one whose name and fame is so indissolubly interwoven with every part of this district should have been forgotten by orthodox Christian devotees. They were probably closely connected with the innumerable societies of ascetics on the banks of the Nile, which may explain why, whilst they are still resorted to with reverence by devotees from Egypt and Abyssinia, they are in no way reverenced or regarded by the members of the Greek Church,