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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 176
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 176. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2383.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 176. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2383

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 176, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2383.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 176
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_194.jpg
Transcript —= I?6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Leaving the sites of the deserted Cities of the Plain, we ascend from the Prophet's Fountain to Quarantania, following the course of an aqueduct still full of water, brought down from Ain Duk, and passing the ruins of extensive mills. Besides the road to Jerusalem on the south bank of the Wady Kelt, no" less than three mountain tracks leading into the hills of Benjamin all start from this point: one, the southernmost, along the edge of the crags between the Quarantania and Wady Kelt to Deir Diwan and Ai; a second turns north and, passing Ain Duk, ascends to Taiyibeh, with a branch to Rummon, the ancient Rimmon ; the third runs straight up from Ain Duk to Deir Diwan, and thus joins the first. We can hardly doubt which of these was the route taken by Joshua and the army of Israel, when after the fall of Jericho they advanced into the interior highlands. It must have been by the first path, since they came to Ai before Bethel. By this track passed Samuel on his way to Gibeah of Benjamin; and down this mountain path Elijah and Elisha descended together for the last time. But Mount Quarantania derives its fame from later events, and from the not unnatural tradition that here was the wilderness, the scene of our Lord's temptation after His baptism. Certainly a spot more apparently remote from the haunts of men it would be difficult to find in any populous neighbourhood. Though by no means the highest point of the range, no other has so abrupt a face, nor one so admirably adapted for the construction of the hermits' dwellings which stud its front towards the Jordan, and also towards the Kelt. There are few more impressive views in Palestine than may be obtained in the clear bright atmosphere when pausing in the ascent of Quarantania. The debris, which rises some two hundred feet above Ain-es-Sultan, slopes from our feet to the oasis. Beyond it is the desert plain, then the Jordan belt, the plains of Shittim, and the bold headlands of Ajalon and of the Moabite range, Hesbon and Nebo rising straight from the north end of the sea. At our back rises the yellow cliff, the bluff of Quarantania, perhaps nine hundred or one thousand feet sheer. The great griffon vultures, singly or in parties, sail majestically past us backwards and forwards, spreading their wings ten feet across; the cliff swallows and swifts dash with their sharp scream within a few inches of our faces; and the clear ringing note of the oranee-wineed grakle from time to time seems to startle the caverns with its echo. In front of many of the cells seats have been scooped out of the rock, where the anchorites might sit and meditate. On this eastern face there are about forty habitable caves and chapels, and a very much larger number on the south side. Many of them communicate internally with each other. They have been approached by staircases and paths hewn out of the face of the rock, but time and water have worn many of them away, and left the upper caverns in some cases wholly inaccessible. The lowest tier is just above the top of the sloping debris, and the chambers are still tenanted by the Arabs for sheepfolds and stables, sometimes as granaries. The next tier, whither still a few Copts and Abyssinian pilgrims come every Lent and keep their forty-days' fast, on the spot where they believe our Lord to have fasted, is easily accessible by the sloping niche in the cliff-side. The cells are a series of chambers, each having recesses hollowed out for sleeping-places, altar, and cupboard. Many of them communicate with a series of chambers above by a