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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 174
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 174. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 174. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2381

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 174, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 174
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_192.jpg
Transcript I74 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. camp. The water which flows through the pool is fed from the springs of Jericho. To this spot the natives, giving it a Mohammedan colouring, have transferred the miraculous fall of the walls of the besieged city and also the standing still of the sun over Quarantania. But slight as are the vestiges of the Canaanitish cities, those of the great city of Herod are scarcely more distinct. An incurious traveller might wander over the whole site, and be scarcely conscious of any traces of antiquity. On each side of the pass from Jerusalem as it debouches into the plain is a ruined tower, marking probably the sites of the great castles which defended the pass, and which Pompey destroyed. Just below are the remains of a castle (El Kakun), and running across the plain from the Wady Kelt is a magnificent aqueduct, under which the road passes, where eleven pointed arches span the dry river-bed. Near this is a large reservoir, Birket Musa, the Pool of Moses, one hundred and eighty-eight yards by one hundred and fifty-seven, long since ruined and neglected. There are traces of the Roman road, once the great thoroughfare from the East to Jerusalem, and two or three sycamore figs still linger by the roadside, lineal descendants perhaps of those trees up one of which Zacchseus climbed to see Jesus as He passed by on His way to Jerusalem. After the destruction of the place by Pompey, Antony had it rebuilt, with the assistance of Herod, and gave it to Cleopatra, from whom Herod governed it for a time, and afterwards secured all its revenues for himself. Here he built palaces, forts, and amphitheatres, and often himself resided, and here, after vainly seeking a cure in the springs of Callirrhoe, he came to die. It was in the hippodrome here that the dying monster had all the chief Jews confined, that they might be massacred at his death and a general mourning insured ; and in the amphitheatre of Jericho, Salome announced his death. Soon afterwards destroyed in a rebellion, Archelaus restored it in yet greater magnificence, and such it was when our Lord visited it. Vespasian again destroyed it; Hadrian rebuilt it, and garrisoned it with the tenth legion. It was the seat of a bishopric under the Byzantine empire and full of churches and convents, but appears to have been swept with the besom of destruction by Shahr Barz, the general of the ruthless Chosroes, a.d. 614. From that period to the time of the Crusades churches and monasteries arose again. The caliphs knew the value of the district and encouraged agriculture, but the city had gone for ever. The present Er Riha, or New Jericho, sprung up in the times of the Crusades, when a few huts were clustered round the fort built for the protection of pilgrims (see page 168). A square tower is the only architectural feature of the wretched village, and is dignified by the name of the house of Zacch^us. It is occupied by a few Turkish soldiers. The huts round it are built of the remains of older buildings, and the inhabitants are a peculiar and most degraded race, very dark, and quite distinct from either Bedouin or the fellahin of the upper country. We feel inclined, as we look at them, to agree with the Jewish belief that they are the descendants of the old Canaanites, degenerated by the oppressive climate and the vices of the Ghor. They are the only people who reside during the whole year in the Jordan valley. The fellahin higher up only come down in autumn and winter to cultivate,