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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 171
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 171. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 171. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2378

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 171, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 171
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_189.jpg
Transcript JERICHO. 171 prickly jujube-bushes, then upon a rude fence of boughs thrown lightly on the ground, but impenetrable from the sharp recurved thorns with which every twig is studded. An artificial rill of water nurtures the crop, and we are within the slovenly farmed oasis of Jericho. We ride through a varied wilderness of indescribable luxuriance, the little plots of corn, melons, or tobacco interspersed among a dense tangle of false balsam-tree {Balanitis jEgyptiacd) or zukkiim, agnus casti, and dom-tree, not to omit the apple of Sodom {Solarium melongena), with its potato-blossom and bright red or yellow fruit. Yet among all these where are the trees from which Jericho of old obtained its name, its fame, and its wealth—the palm? Not one remains. There are no stragglers in that wild and thorny tangle which have survived from the destruction of the gardens of Cleopatra; not one sorghum stem springs by the water-side as a relic of the plantations which yielded vast revenues to the Knights of Jerusalem ; no balsam-tree lingers in the maze of shrubbery; and, above all, the last palm has gone, and its graceful feathery crown waves no more over the plain, which once gave to Jericho its name of the City of Palm-trees. Immediately in front towers the Quarantania, the Mount of Temptation, with its precipitous face pierced in every direction by ancient cells and chapels, and the ruined church on its topmost peak. We halt in front of the famous spring, the Prophet's Fountain, Ain-es-Sultan (see page 172), shaded by a fine fig-tree, where an immense volume of clear warm water, 840 Fahr., very pure, and swarming with fish, bursts from the shingle at the foot of a great mound, evidently artificial, and composed of the remains of ancient Jericho, full of fragments of pottery and frequent morsels of nacreous glass. Behind the spring, and partially enclosing it, is a ruined edifice, apparently a small Roman temple; and strewn about are fragments of shafts and Byzantine capitals. The copious stream is tapped within fifty yards of its exit by various artificial watercourses, through which the Arabs lead the life-giving liquid from time to time over their patches of cultivation, through jungles of cane and tamarisk. From the great " tell," or mound of ruins, the ground steadily rises till we reach the foot of Jebel Quarantania (see page 173). Old Jericho stood midway between the pass up to Jerusalem on the south and the passes of Benjamin towards Bethel on the north. There are three great springs which water it, and as we look towards the hills we can see how easily Joshua's spies could avoid observation as they stole up through the ravine choked with jungle and cane-brake to Ain-duk, and thence to the mountain, amidst the caves and ravines of which they might be searched for in vain. In the oasis of Jericho, whose beauty was such that Wisdom compares herself with its rose-plants (Ecclus. xxiv. 14), Strabo tells us that for the space of a hundred stadia by twenty, opobalsamum, henna, myrrh, and all sorts of spices were grown. From the Prophet's Fountain we may set out to search for the traces of Gilgal, the neighbour and contemporary of the older city. It had long passed away from history, and its name was almost lost to local memory, when a German traveller recovered it in a mound called Tell Jiljul, and an artificial pond, Birket Jiljulia. It is on the direct road to the upper ford at the Convent of St. John, about four and a half miles from it,