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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 170
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 170. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2377.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 170. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2377

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 170, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2377.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 170
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_188.jpg
Transcript K= I7o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. have been polluted by the images of idols. It may excite surprise that the buildings of the Christian period should be so numerous and so noble as are these monasteries. But this is explained when we remember how in the period that succeeded their foundation by Jerome and his immediate followers Palestine enjoyed an epoch of exceptional quiet amid the ravages of the northern barbarians in the rest of the Roman empire. Nor was the calm broken till the storm of Chosroes and his exterminating Persians burst upon the hapless East at the end of the sixth century. Then all these monasteries were sacked and fired, and their inmates butchered. Ere the country could recover itself, within fifty years, a yet more fatal though less cruel war of conquest swept over Palestine in the Caliph Omar and his Moslem Arabs. The Moslem did not exterminate the Christian or forbid his rites. Some of the monasteries were permitted to be repaired and reoccupied, but the cost was great and the Christian population utterly impoverished. Then came a transient burst of spasmodic prosperity, when the Crusaders erected their sugar-mills and cultivated this rich Jordan valley. When the Mohammedan sway was re-established the monasteries soon, as above stated, became useless. As we pass across the narrow belt of open plain which intervenes between the Monastery of St. John and the oasis of Jericho, we step back from mediaeval remains to the mounds of primaeval history. Jericho, " the City of Palm-trees," was the contemporary of the doomed Cities of the Plain, and whatever doubt may hang over their exact position, there is none whatever on the Jericho of the prophets. In speaking of Jericho we must bear in mind that the name is claimed by three distinct cities of different ages, succeeding one another. First, there is the old Canaanitish city, destroyed by Joshua and rebuilt by Hiel, the resort of Elijah and Elisha; secondly, the Jericho of the Herods and of the New Testament; and thirdly, Er Riha, the crusading and modern representative, the name, strangely different as it sounds in its English rendering, being the Arabic equivalent of the old Hebrew Jericho. The first of these, and by far the most interesting, is that to which we will direct our steps on our return from the fords of Jordan at Helu. From the ruined monastery by the river, Kasr-el-Yehud (see page 163), where the great cistern on which the colony depended for its water supply is still nearly perfect, we may trace the utterly ruined aqueduct by which it was supplied from the famous Prophet's Fountain. Of the seven monasteries recorded in history in the plain the ruins of five are known, but of these only three are identified. They are all a little to the south of our course. Looking at this barren plain, with its occasional copses of thorn-tree {zukkiim) and Spina Christi, we may wonder how a considerable population could ever have existed until we notice the remains of their aqueducts, no less than twelve of which have been traced and mapped by Lieut. Conder. When we leave the upper channel of the river not a tree or blade of grass, only a few shrubs with microscopic foliage, are visible till we reach the oasis of old Jericho, Ain-es-Sultan. Yet the plain is not level. It is studded with desert islands—flat-topped mounds of salt-encumbered marl without a particle of vegetation, and the crumbling sides of which are yearly being washed by the floods back into the Jordan, which once deposited them. At length we come upon a few scattered