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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 166
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 166. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2373.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 166. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2373

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 166, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2373.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 166
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_184.jpg
Transcript l66 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. 9 pilgrims was said to number hundreds of thousands; and even now they amount to several thousands. The day fixed is Easter Monday, and the Turkish Government have for many ages guaranteed the safe conduct of the convoy. It starts from the neighbourhood of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, in front of which the pilgrims generally assemble, preceded by a white flag and noisy instruments ; the rearguard being composed of Turkish troops with the green flag of the Prophet. The number of pilgrims at the Greek Easter now rarely reaches five thousand, though it is said that formerly ten thousand joined the procession. A merry joyous crowd they seem, the roar of voices often drowning the incessant clatter of the tomtoms in front and rear. Few of them are on foot except the Russian peasants. Every kind of quadruped, camel, horse, mule, and ass, has been impressed for the occasion, and the hapless camels flounder down the steep descent to Jericho with huge baskets full of women and children on either side. The Bedouin of the neighbourhood hangs about the desert cliffs and dells ready to cut off any incautious straggler, and to send him to rejoin the convoy prematurely stripped for his bathe. Against these marauders was formed the company of nine knights who became the founders of the historic order of the Templars. Arrived long before sunset at Er Riha, the modern Jericho, but really near the ancient Gilgal, the motley crowd bivouacs for the night. A stroll among the tented and untented groups will afford one of the most varied and picturesque scenes which even in that land of the picturesque the traveller can encounter. Every costume, from the sheepskin-clad and odoriferous Russian to the bright dresses of the Bulgarians, the quaint robes of the Georgians, the brilliant colours of the Greek, and the solid richness of the Armenian, is collected from all Eastern Europe and Western Asia. But soon all is hushed, and the camp fires are smouldering embers, and the long straggling camp, stretching some three miles across the plain, is buried in sleep, recalling the encampment of Israel first pitched at Gilgal, this very spot. Long before sunrise, about three o'clock, there is a sudden roll of kettledrums, and lights are struck all over the plain. There is none of the merriment of the preceding day, but by torchlight, in solemn silence, with the paschal moon hanging forward out of the deep black sky and dimming the glare of the torches, the mixed multitude presses on to the bank of the sacred river. Just after daybreak the head of the procession reaches the open space on the river's bank, and before the sun has well overtopped the hills of Moab the first-comers are plunging in the whirling eddies of the turbid stream. Some dash in naked and exhibit their prowess, acquired perhaps in the distant Nile or its Abyssinian feeders, as they strike or seem to strike across with their arms backwards and forwards. Most, however, of those who have come in families bathe in a long white garment, which after this Jordan baptism is carefully preserved till it serves as the winding-sheet of its owner. I have noticed devout families joining hand-in-hand in a circle in the water, the women having their babes slung round their neck, and reciting the creed, ducking at each sentence, while they hold on to the overhanging boughs. One remarkable feature is the number of little children and infants ; but the age of the pilgrim matters not, and the Jordan baptism never needs to be repeated. Primitive and